Delicate bites

Line Clip

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Nov 12, 2020
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Very often the banter on the car park after the match, centers on the mishaps, the bait, lost fish, or at the moment lack of bites.
With the social distancing at the moment the banter appears to have got louder due to the raised voices covering the 2 mtr plus distance .
Packing the gear back into the car after the match, I over heard the lads shouting about how the carp were feeding,very finicky and how there floats only
dipped a mm or how they had the float dotted down to a pimple to see the bites and using small hooks and fine lines to get a bite. and yet I
was using the hybrid feeder, 14 QM1 7LBS hook length , and they would pull the
rod of the rest if you let them no problem.
Is this down to the carp feeling the hook going in and bolting off, if so why is not the same on the pole, why the delicate touches on the pole float,
or is it what we think are carp, are small silvers touching the bait, hence the tiny dips on the float.
What do you think?
 

Zerkalo

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Jamie Hughes underwater videos are a good watch for what happens when feeder fishing. I would say it's the bolt effect from the weight of the feeder.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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This is something I find with F1s. Shyest of bites on the pole yet the most violent takes on the feeder. It has to be down to the fish's reaction to feeling the weight of the feeder.
 

Ken the Pacman

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The difference is simply that the pull rounds on the tip are fish already hooked so they are swimming off or bolting because they feel the resistance of the weight combined with the short hooklength hence the name bolt rig.
The shy bites on the float are often what we referred to as "testers" because the fish were not feeding heavily and were not quite sure about the behaviour of the hookbait compared to the loose feed although it can also happen when nothing has been fed. Roach and F1s are often the worst for this.
 

G0zzer2

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That's why hair rigs were invented. The fish takes in the bait but realises something is wrong and quickly ejects it. But the hook then catches in the lips of the fish, and when it feels that it bolts off and hooks itself. That's why so many feeder rigs are called bolt rigs. So of course you're likely get more pull-round bites on a feeder, especially if using hair rigs.
 

Northantslad

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They don't instantly realise something is wrong on the pole-less resistance in comparison to the feeder. Due to to this and when pole fishing close in, its sometimes the case that fish get landed before they even realise they are hooked.

When pole fishing at distance, its often the case that they don't run and only then when (if) you pull. Its why you can guide, rather than pull, on hooking the fish, them away from the fed area and sometimes all the way down to the top kit easily. I like to imagine the pole is a thin glass tube and if i squeeze too hard or make sudden movements i will shatter it, just lightly gripping it between the fingers.

Similar thing when discussing playing Barbel on a feeder rod, then a float rod, most of the time the harder you pull or your set up pulls back on the fish, the harder they will pull back.
 

Rick123

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That's why hair rigs were invented. The fish takes in the bait but realises something is wrong and quickly ejects it. But the hook then catches in the lips of the fish, and when it feels that it bolts off and hooks itself. That's why so many feeder rigs are called bolt rigs. So of course you're likely get more pull-round bites on a feeder, especially if using hair rigs.

First they have to get the bait IN THE mouth. I say this because if you watch cautious carp feed they don't always take a bite right back, but mouth it around the lips. I and many other have used the hair for 30 years and the fish still get away with it many times. If they take it fully (like the do often with balanced or lighter baits) you're spot on and they hook themselves.

I had a funny day today, when I had lost of bites on maggot through the water, but just could not see them regardless of how low I shotted the float, bugger? I also broke my wonderful Daiwa X 13' float rod, rubbish day apart form one big roach over a pound.
 
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