Dave Harrell 3lb Pro Float Line

richox12

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I think if we are honest the early pre-streched lines like double strengh were rubbish and no body in there right mind used them.

Someone must like it a lot though as 35 years on and it's still selling.

I think lines pre the mid 1980's may have seemed simpler to understand because there were nowhere near so many brands and options available as there is now. My local shop - which I worked in late 70's early 80's - had, apart from trout leader mono (so like Kroic) , Maxima, Aiken Bayer Perlon, Platil & Shakespeare Omni. There may have been another (Sylcast likely) but I cannot remember it. The BIGGEST sellers by far were Maxima & Bayer Perlon and Bayer Perlon easily outsold Maxima - probably because it was much cheaper. Everyone, and I mean everyone, asked for line by BS. Diameter was virtually irrelevant. I was one of them.

But that was then. Now I only think of diameter. The BS is whatever it is as I have a very good idea of what it should be or is likely to be.
 

Sam Vimes

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I think if we are honest the early pre-streched lines like double strengh were rubbish and no body in there right mind used them.

I don't particularly disagree. However, some must, because all these years later, Drennan are still selling it.
My suspicion is that it breaking at less than the stated breaking strain, rather than significantly more (as most monos of the time did), was enough to see early users put off it completely. The same issue is still apparent in folks that have contentedly been using under rated lines (Maxima, Bayer, Sensor etc) for years.
 

trotter2

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I don't particularly disagree. However, some must, because all these years later, Drennan are still selling it.
My suspicion is that it breaking at less than the stated breaking strain, rather than significantly more (as most monos of the time did), was enough to see early users put off it completely. The same issue is still apparent in folks that have contentedly been using under rated lines (Maxima, Bayer, Sensor etc) for ye[/QU
Absolutely ?
 

NoCarpPlease

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I'm going to commit heresy here - but I am increasingly of the opinion that the "hi tec" monos are utterly pointless from the point of view of "strength" .... at least on rod & line.
I have used them as hooklengths since the mid 80s .... on whip, pole and float rods.
The option to have a lower diameter without losing strength was certainly a great attraction - suddenly I could use 0.10 hooklength with my 0.16 reel line and get the same safety margin as fishing "straight through".
However - these days the chub are bigger and my chub rigs are mainly 0.16 Bayer and 0.15 hi-tec hooklength (dropping to 0.13 when needed). On stated breaking strains the mainline should break first every time (on a snag or a fish) - but the opposite is true. Whether this is because the hooklength is nearer the point of abrasion / damage - or the relative stretch characteristics?
I have a friend who has gone back to using Bayer for hooklengths (as Danny (Halton Dangler) does, as it happens). He catches plenty of fish in matches.

Perhaps it's all a red herring? Maybe we should be only concerned about stiffness (mostly related to diameter), density/finish, abrasion resistance and visibility?
 

Sam Vimes

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I'm going to commit heresy here

I'd go a little further with the heresy. I no longer see any point in using reel lines of less than a nominal 4lb breaking strain, especially if it's a low diameter line. I'm utterly unconvinced that fish a remotely bothered by heavier mainlines, provided they are used in conjunction with a lower diameter/breaking strain hooklink. Using a heavier mainline (within the capabilities of the rod being used) allows me the flexibility to increase the hooklink when a bigger stamp of fish move in. If you are using 3lb, or less, you have little room for manoeuvre.
 

nejohn

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I agree with the last few posts, I choose my reel line very differently to how I choose a line for hook lengths, diameter/breaking strain only becomes an issue when it affects my ability to cast consistently and accurately or when it becomes an issue with how it affects the presentation of the end tackle like when the current has an effect on a thicker line. For me a good reel line should be fairly limp, consistent in dia, abrasion resistant and either sink or float depending on the method being used. A hook length should be very limp, not prone to twist, of the smallest diameter that is sensible to use and if we could make it invisible that would be great
 

NoCarpPlease

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Sam Vimes,

I agree up to a point - which has little relevance to your fishing - but lighter mainlines have a place for me for fishing with light floats - especially in slower flows. I know one (in)famous forumite on FM uses 6 pound sensor for floatfishing. Which I can understand for his chosen quarry of Barbel and is OK with his choice of floats being 5g Bolo.
For me fishing for roach on the Warwickshire Avon, using a 2 no. 6 stick flaot - I know from experience that it won't work as well.
 

Silverfisher

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I have no doubt using 3lb line over 4lb has aided my casting and line pick up/control slightly but I doubt it makes much difference to the fish as that’s where the hooklength comes into it. I see no point in going lighter than a 3lb mainline as at that strength you can still land bonus fish with it still being light enough to not put off smaller fish if that is a factor. If it’s so hard that 3lb mainline puts the fish off I don’t really want to be fishing it lol
 

NoCarpPlease

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I agree with the last few posts, I choose my reel line very differently to how I choose a line for hook lengths, diameter/breaking strain only becomes an issue when it affects my ability to cast consistently and accurately or when it becomes an issue with how it affects the presentation of the end tackle like when the current has an effect on a thicker line. For me a good reel line should be fairly limp, consistent in dia, abrasion resistant and either sink or float depending on the method being used. A hook length should be very limp, not prone to twist, of the smallest diameter that is sensible to use and if we could make it invisible that would be great
So what hooklength line do you use nejohn?

BTW - I should have added stretch to my list of line qualities!
 

Zerkalo

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I think if I used 0.12 Stroft (lightest in Stroft i have) with 0.14 DH line the 0.14 would go first = potentially lost rigs. :unsure:

In fact I'm going to try to test that today. edit - pointless test as Stroft 0.12 is rated 4lb. I would have to be fishing with 0.10 hooklengths.
 
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Lee Richards

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Keith Speer who was probably the best float fishing Barbel angler and has a resume of fantastic fish used 0.17 (6.7lb BS) on the pin all the time.
His second rod was set-up with Power line of 0.19 dia or 7lb 6oz BS
His go to hook length material was 0.13 to 0.15 (4lb 12 oz to 5lb 14oz ) Preston Innovations Power line.

On the float in the middle of Winter and in the world of Barbel Fishing he is a legend

image2.jpg
 
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Sam Vimes

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Sam Vimes,

I agree up to a point - which has little relevance to your fishing - but lighter mainlines have a place for me for fishing with light floats - especially in slower flows. I know one (in)famous forumite on FM uses 6 pound sensor for floatfishing. Which I can understand for his chosen quarry of Barbel and is OK with his choice of floats being 5g Bolo.
For me fishing for roach on the Warwickshire Avon, using a 2 no. 6 stick flaot - I know from experience that it won't work as well.

I fully accept that the lighter end of the spectrum can have its uses, particularly for light waggler and stick float fishing. However, 4lb (Pro Float and Preston Reflo), in conjunction with much lighter hooklinks, is now my default light set up. On the relatively rare occasions that I fish either method, that is light enough for me and still allows me some wriggle room to up the hooklink from sub-1lb to just over 3lb if necessary.
 

Zerkalo

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I just tied some 0.10 Reflo (2lb 10oz) to the 3lb 0.14 DH line and as expected/stated the Reflo gave first. So maybe it's just me that is not used to 3lb reel line. Even 4lb reel line I am used to Maxima which is known to be understated.
 

Silverfisher

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For most waggler and stick fishing I mostly use size 18 to 2.5lb 0.12 drennan silverfish hooks to nylon with the 3lb 0.15 maxima and 3.2lb 0.16 float fish so that’ll be my starting point with the 3lb 0.14 pro float float as well. I sometimes use kamasan size 18 b611 to 2.25lb and size 18 b911 to 2.75lb as well which I believe sit just either side of 0.12. It’s quite rare I drop to 20s and 2lb/0.11 hooklengths.

And yeah you do have to just get used to light rod light line fishing. Once you get the hang of it you can land fish way beyond its stated tolerance not that you’d want to do it all that often lol
 

NoCarpPlease

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I think if I used 0.12 Stroft (lightest in Stroft i have) with 0.14 DH line the 0.14 would go first = potentially lost rigs. :unsure:

In fact I'm going to try to test that today. edit - pointless test as Stroft 0.12 is rated 4lb. I would have to be fishing with 0.10 hooklengths.
Try that test ... you might be surprised
 

Zerkalo

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I'm looking forward to getting an Acolyte rod which I think will help no end as I am not sure how far I will get starting out with a 12 foot Tricast.

Interestingly I find the clutch on the Series 7 reel to be suited to being set soft, I know you're a backwinder Silverfisher, but I'm used to using a clutch and I used that reel on the Crucian venue I fished the other day and struggled to control the couple of Carp I hooked on the clutch.

I will try the Stroft 0.12 to both 3lb and 4lb DH line and see what happens.
 

NoCarpPlease

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worth also saying - if your Reflo is Reflo Power - then it isn't 0.10 ... it'll be more like 0.12 diameter
I've never seen or measured stroft - so don't know if that is accurate
 

nejohn

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So what hooklength line do you use nejohn?

BTW - I should have added stretch to my list of line qualities!
My hook length lines tend to be G line or Guru N gauge but I have been having a tinker with Daiwa TDR ......unfortunately non of them seem to have the invisibility quality that we would all find advantageous
And yes I agree about stretch, in a reel line for float fishing especially I like some stretch, I should also add that the right reel line has to be teamed with the right rod.....no point using 2lb line with a 1.5lb TC rod..
 

richox12

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As lines are all over the place in so far as labeling is concerned and as we don't know how each line is made and from which grades/blends of nylon I suspect most of us are, or have been, using so called High tech lines anyway.
 

Silverfisher

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Yeah you do have to set the clutch light on it especially with an acolyte which makes me nervy which is why I backwind.

I haven’t had a big fish trotting on the acolyte/series 7 combo yet as have only had them paired up for 18 months. Probably had nothing much over a pound from rivers on it so far but on Stillwaters I’ve had scaper double carp on it which isn’t fun but 2-3lb perch and 3-4lb bream are great fun on it so I’d imagine 4-5lb chub wouldnt give you much grief as even carp don’t at that size. My grandad did have 20lb mirror on his which took about a week to land, he remained surprisingly calm whereas I hate hooking carp on mine lol
 
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