cormorants fore or against

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Dave

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To to expand the debate further:

There is a group of birdwatchers in Europe that are completly nuts about cormorants, they have a yearly seminar and a website that can be found on http://web.tiscali.it/sv2001/ they spend their time studying them

Just thought that you may like to see it icon_smile.gif

Dave
 

Ziptrev

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And further:-
Quote from Angling Times 3/01/02 issue page 10 1st letter
(Yes I know its a comic, but the source is easily checkable and comes from the National Environment Research Councils winter issue of NERC News}
Quote "In the early 1960s there were only 800 pairs of inland Cormorants in mainland Europe, all in the Netherlands.
Today there are 200,000 pairs spread across the Continent"
Staggering statistic.
I thought I was poor 'cos I had no shoes, 'til I saw a man with no feet!
Trev
 

scouse

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HI ZIPTREV
have a look on anglers net
good reading on same subject
only found it today the subject that is
tightlines dave(scouse)
 

Geoff P

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quote:There is a group of birdwatchers in Europe that are completly nuts about cormorants, they have a yearly seminar and a website that can be found on http://web.tiscali.it/sv2001/ they spend their time studying them

Just thought that you may like to see it icon_smile.gif

Dave

Dave the kind of birdwatchers site I like is fantasy121, but I shan't put the complete address on here in case juniors are looking in.

The cormorants I see on the lake in Swansea actually come up from Swansea Harbour every day. Are they still the inland species?

Geoff
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ada

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I was fishing a match on the river avon just outside stratford upon avon and the trees were black with cormorants,I counted over seventy of them(year 2000).twenty five what I consider to be fair anglers fished the match on the river which was perfect,23 blanked and 2 caught a couple of minnows.These birds are killing our river fishing,the trent around burton and through to derby has been destroyed by them, so call me selfish but I believe that these birds are sea inhabitants and they are destroying the places where anglers were taught to glide a stick through a swim,not drop 16 metres of carbon in a oversize garden pond!!.In my garage is a reel called a centerpin remember the name,they are going the same way as the dodo!! 6 years ago my dad and I would have to help each other get our keepnets out on the trent,today a fish is a bonus. why do you find very few cormorants on carp puddles? are owners shooting these birds? if so good luck to them. A law should be put through enabling these birds to be shot on sight.
 

Geoff P

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Quote: why do you find very few cormorants on carp puddles?

I think the main reason is because the water is coloured. Cormorants normally feed in fairly clear water.

Geoff
If it swims, catch it.
 

Ziptrev

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Geoff,
far too simplistic, in a reply from the guy who wrote the website cormorantbusters, he informed me that Any commercial fishery on its private land will take any necessary steps to protect their investments and significantly NOT one fishery has been prosecuted by the RSPB for shooting cormorants as many openly have.
The counter claim for loss of profit would easily exceed the fine,so the Government dont wanna know.
Trev
 

Tony

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I'm not sure that I know enough to comment about them but from an ecological point of view there are many imbalances in the world due to mans interuptions of the natural cycles and evolvments where species are concerned which in turn can and often does come around and bite us in the posterior (thought I better not say arse Dave) and the cormorant issue is one of them.

Got to go and hug a tree now, :) Tony
 

ada

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have any anglers seen a cormorant on a carp puddle(sorry commercial fishery!)?I fish them nearly every weekend all around the midlands,Im yet to see one although I have seen numerous on the rivers .my comment about this earlier in this forum that was quoted"why are there no cormorants on carp puddles" was highlited by the angling times last year which showed a few shot cormorants on a commercial fishery on its front cover.the colour of the water is no problem to these birds they are the anglers ultimate nightmare which need goverment action now.speak to any of the main river men they will tell you the cormorants are not the only reason for the demise of our rivers, but they ARE THE MAIN CAUSE AND THE BIGGEST THREAT TO THERE RECOVERY........
 

Cyprinid_boy

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The larger 'carp puddles' such as drayton (last year), and currently boddington and clattercote were rife with cormorants. I would suggest that fish size and the presence of man are the determining factors as to why they do not frequent such waters as often as they do the rivers and now canals. Cormorants do feed, albeit not as happily, in coloured water. The biggest deterrent is weed, however, you can't fish the lake either!!! The most successful legal deterrent Ive seen was employed by British waterways at boddington reservoir. A chap from our firm (thankfully not me) was employed to chase them with a boat and they did yet bored and finally went. This happened over a period of two weeks, but only needed doing when they fly from roost at first light.

Cyp.
 

Dave

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Many moons ago, I worked on a large Carp/Coarse farm in Germany. There the shooting of Herons was illegal and anyone found doing so faced a jail sentence.
The owner was plagued by Herons especially in the smaller ponds where upto 30 at a time could be seen feeding in the shallows. Despite having 'timed' blasts, horns and everything else you could think of, the Herons still came and could not be distracted.
Finally the only solution was to chase them off. A couple of locals were employed solely for that purpose armed with a couple of lurcher type dogs and they patrolled the lakes/ponds daily.
This didn't exactly cure the problem but certainly reduced it.

Dave
 
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