Commercials or naturals

Lee Richards

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A Commercial by pure definition would surely be any water that sells permits to fish the water to generate a profit for the seller.
It's age doesn't matter if its one hundred or more,thirty years or started last week - they still fit the profile.

If we are talking about waters not stocked by man in some way I bet you would be hard pushed to find many.
 

Silverfisher

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It is crazy how it's stocked itself to that extent, it's a bit hard to tell without fishing it but it looks to have them of every size from 1oz to about 10-11oz so I suspect there's some pounders in there as well. Pretty sure there's a few roach amongst them but hard to be completely certain from the bank.

And yeah generally big Rudd are rare as rocking horse poo around here as well. Theres a few places where you can catch a few small ones but they are always out numbered and outsized by the roach. In most of the places there's probably near 10 times as many roach as Rudd and they tend to be of both twice the average and max size.
 

bryan white

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All my local lakes are reclaimed gravel extraction sites, all over 30 years plus.
i cannot call them natural, nor my local canal, but they as the first venues I fished will always be my favourite type of pleasure venue.
commercials definitely for matches..good fishing and bacon butties
Going to spend this year giving rivers a try ( lodden and wey)with the aforementioned canal and lakes as a back up if rain makes them unfishable.
you never know, rivers might become my new favourite
 

mike fox

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Canals are 'commercial' as they were originally purpose built for profit by the 'commercial' transportation of goods around the country. Stocking levels have no bearing on a fishery being a 'commercial' as this is purely a marketing strategy for profiteering by the owners. ie, loads of fish, get loads of fishermen at a price versus fewer fish, get fewer fishermen but for less cost. I love fishing commercials as much as I do naturals, it's just a different mind set on your approach. My personal feelings are that you don't learn a great deal about angling on a commercial, but you do learn about fishing. This is why I have always said there is a difference between angling and fishing because if you adopt 'commercial' tactics into a 'natural' and lesser stocked environment you may well come unstuck and be disappointed.
 

Silver fan 82

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havnt caught a big rudd for years, used to fish a lovely gravel pit many many moons ago, used to be feeder fishing for first 3hrs, then it would usually go iffy so it was fishing over the same spot with a waggler and a nice worm loose feeding casters or maggots, wouldnt get many bits but every rudd was well over 1lb, they have filled the lake in now and built houses on it!
Shame when they build on nice places. Funny you should mention worm, a lot of the bigger rudd I have caught came to half a lobworm intended for perch or tench.
 

Rick123

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Problem is, most anglers want to catch fish, some fish? I could go a week after a big tench, roach, but I find as i get older, I prefer to catch most times out. On Natural venues I cannot guarantee that, it fine on the odd occasion. Maybe i only have another few years left, who knows, I prefer to catch now-days. What I do hate about commercials the damaged fish, the crowds, and people shouting to their mates with endless rubbish. You don't get that on Natural waters. But I'm enjoying both more and more.
 

Tallshort23

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I like both but would lean towards naturals as I like the variations you get on Rivers and canals and the fact there are little restrictions on baits/keepnets etc.

The plus point for commercials is the fact you dont have to deal with boaters/dog walkers/cyclists/general ignorant public.

I have found a 3rd way which seems to offer the best of both worlds. I recently joined a fishing club that has a fair mix of rivers, lakes and canals. There is secure parking and well kept pegs. With the exception of the canals most of the fishing areas are not open to joe public and its nice to be able park behind my peg on a river and know the only people I am likely to see are other club members. I know this may come across a bit rude but I have had my fill of stupid people buggering up my fishing down the years and yearn for a quiet life..
 

MartinWY

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Do we have many truly natural still waters in England? The lake district would be one area that springs to mind, but are there others?
 

Dusty

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Yeah I believe they are but still impressive to go from empty to the below in 20 years.
View attachment 34843
There was another a pond in my old village dug for the millennium and stocked with a few carp and Rudd yet when I fished it about 5 years later and it had perch in it so is interesting where they appear from lol
Could be from eggs transferred from plants/weed that have been put in or by waterfowl maybe?

My old man got some pondweed for a small ornamental feature at his place of work, it was literally a 3FT X 3FT raised brick square about 2ft deep in the middle.

He went out one day and found it full of tiny fish which are still thriving today, clearly the weed contained eggs of some sort which had survived transfer.
 

Markywhizz

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From my perspective I don’t think defining a natural water is about whether it is man made or certainly anything to do with it’s age. A commercial is somewhere that has been built for the purpose of fishing and anything else such as mill ponds and gravel pits or canals are naturals.

I really like fishing both. There are places that you might class as over stocked but if they were really over stocked the fish would die. I prefer the term heavily stocked and I have no objection to that. What does turn me off though is when the fish have damaged mouths and fins and scales missing. That’s not caused by over stocking it’s caused by ignorant anglers.

In general I love well stocked and well managed commercials. Somewhere like ash lake at Alders is very heavily stocked but it’s a joy to fish and the fish are generally pristine. A local commie to us doesn’t allow the use of boillies or particles and that seems to keep the riff-raff away and again the fish are very healthy and in good condition.

I’ve recently discovered the joy of the angling clubs round me though. They are all small natural venues and I really enjoy fishing them. Even if I blank I have a great day out in nature so I’m not really bothered. I just love fishing.
 
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