Cold.

Sportsman

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I went fishing yesterday, the first day of the cold snap. Temps between 0' -3'C and mist/freezing fog.
I thought I was properly prepared, but to be honest, I wasn't. I had my new Milo Pro B&B and jacket, which is waterproof and windproof, but not well insulated. The problem was I was not wearing enough of the right things underneath it.
I fished from 10.00h-14.30h and, tbh, didn't feel particularly cold. My feet were cold, but no shivering or teeth chattering. It was only when I stopped that I noticed how bad I felt, I was staggering and when I bent down to put my pole in the holdall I just fell forwards. I was sluggish and disoriented and still had a 45 min drive to get home. I was also alone.
I decided to get into my car and get the heater on, but it was over 30 minutes before I felt even close to normal, let alone fit enough to drive. I finally drove home with no issues, but was I impaired? without a doubt, luckily the roads here are very quiet.
On reflection, I almost certainly suffered a low grade slow onset hypothermia, the type that can creep up on you without you really noticing, especially as you get older. I am 73 with a history of two strokes and a heart condition, along with poor circulation to the extremities, so I am a perfect candidate and should have known better.
A timely reminder, especially for our more mature members:
Don't overdo it and fish for too long. Stop if you start to feel strange.
Dress adequately, proper preparation. Food and hot drinks.
When I fell over I was close to the edge of the lake. Had I fallen in I would have died, there was no one else around.
If you start to feel bad, get into shelter, car or building, and rewarm.
Use your phone to get help if you have to and do it now. You might not be able to later. Looking back, it is what I should have done.
Enjoy your fishing, but be aware, cold is sneaky and can kill you (y)
 

brian carragher

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I know exactly what you're saying, I pike fish all through the winter mainly on my own and through all the worst of weather the gods can throw at me and sometimes the cold does get to me too

Dry weather is just as bad when you get that lazy cold wind that goes through rather than round and yesterday was a good example of that, I was glad when I'd had enough and sat in the van for a warm, that cold creeps on you sometimes without you even noticing but what I do is every now and again is get the gear in and either have a stiff walk up and down or try for a brisk run to get the circulation going properly again
 

rudd

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Did any of you have a shelter/ brolley up?
Always wary of windchill.
 

Dave

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Just to add to the above, another issue with the cold is your arteries tighten up to increase your blood pressure when cold in order to speed the flow of blood throughout your body. If you have a heart condition or high blood pressure this can cause issues, ultimately heart attack or failure depending on the severity and exposure.
Strenuous exercise such as lugging tackle around, pushing laden trollies, hard work and heavy lifting, anything that would normally put pressure on your heart, can amplify issues if you are not careful.

Take care people and keep warm, fishing is a hobby/sport we all love but not something worth putting yourself at risk for :)
 

davylad

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I wear good base layers when it's cold, as I hate being bulked up that much you can hardly move. The worst where I live is the cold easterly winds, if you have the wrong gear on it just cuts through you. I'll be on the beach tomorrow, a couple of cod will warm me up. (y)Bloody ell Dave, just seen your post, I'll be climbing down and back up steep cliffs will enough gear that a pack horse would struggle with, that's without a longish walk on the sand. I better have a few recovery stops, and take my blood pressure. :eek:
 

Reuben

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Just given all my merino wool base layers their annual wash. Next week it’ll be reproofing the Goretex gear. Winter‘s coming……..
 

rudd

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I wear good base layers when it's cold, as I hate being bulked up that much you can hardly move. The worst where I live is the cold easterly winds, if you have the wrong gear on it just cuts through you. I'll be on the beach tomorrow, a couple of cod will warm me up. (y)Bloody ell Dave, just seen your post, I'll be climbing down and back up steep cliffs will enough gear that a pack horse would struggle with, that's without a longish walk on the sand. I better have a few recovery stops, and take my blood pressure. :eek:
That same cold Easterly off the North Sea gets us down here in Suffolk Davy.
Pity the same Cod dont make it down here any more.
That big donk and drop back made long cold nights on the beach worth it.
Pin Whiting and a few Pout dont cut the mustard!
 

brian carragher

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Did any of you have a shelter/ brolley up?
Always wary of windchill.
Yes, always carry my brolly during the winter and was sat inside it all Sunday but it was still bitter, as we might say, it was nithering

I wouldn't have liked to been out all day without it,
 

Godber

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I fell in a few years back, soaked wet through on a very cold day. The grief l went through packing my gear away whilst freezing cold was awful, l was bitterly cold. Learned a lesson, so now one of the first things that goes into the car is my bag of spare clothes, towel socks pants t shirt overalls fleece and hat.
 

Arry

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Bloomin cold days... I sit well back from the waters edge, (been in before, not nice) get a brolly up asap, got my heated gilet and socks on, flask of hot tea/coffee and oat bars/flapjacks (slow release, hi carb snacks).cold weather fishing can be made enjoyable... it the lakes got a lid on it I stay home though...
(Tip... don't sit on the bomb or feeder all day, float/pole fish, the continual casting/shipping in and out will keep you warm... sitting stock still watching a feeder rod tip will chill you down)
 

johnfranks

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I was out yesterday. What I wore was mountaineering socks, thermal base layer, micro fleece top & fleece joggers, hoodie. Then when I get there my Drennan quilted bib n brace, Drennan windbeater fleece and my trusty Baffin boots. Oh and lots of Coffee.
And I have worked in minus 20 before so the golden rule is layers. If you get too hot you can remove something.
 

JLK

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I went fishing yesterday, the first day of the cold snap. Temps between 0' -3'C and mist/freezing fog.
I thought I was properly prepared, but to be honest, I wasn't. I had my new Milo Pro B&B and jacket, which is waterproof and windproof, but not well insulated. The problem was I was not wearing enough of the right things underneath it.
I fished from 10.00h-14.30h and, tbh, didn't feel particularly cold. My feet were cold, but no shivering or teeth chattering. It was only when I stopped that I noticed how bad I felt, I was staggering and when I bent down to put my pole in the holdall I just fell forwards. I was sluggish and disoriented and still had a 45 min drive to get home. I was also alone.
I decided to get into my car and get the heater on, but it was over 30 minutes before I felt even close to normal, let alone fit enough to drive. I finally drove home with no issues, but was I impaired? without a doubt, luckily the roads here are very quiet.
On reflection, I almost certainly suffered a low grade slow onset hypothermia, the type that can creep up on you without you really noticing, especially as you get older. I am 73 with a history of two strokes and a heart condition, along with poor circulation to the extremities, so I am a perfect candidate and should have known better.
A timely reminder, especially for our more mature members:
Don't overdo it and fish for too long. Stop if you start to feel strange.
Dress adequately, proper preparation. Food and hot drinks.
When I fell over I was close to the edge of the lake. Had I fallen in I would have died, there was no one else around.
If you start to feel bad, get into shelter, car or building, and rewarm.
Use your phone to get help if you have to and do it now. You might not be able to later. Looking back, it is what I should have done.
Enjoy your fishing, but be aware, cold is sneaky and can kill you (y)
Are you off your rocker? I can't believe after surviving two strokes and a heart attack you're out in those temps at your age and also alone.
Even breathing in freezing cold air can cause issues/cardiac arrest for people with heart conditions.
At least your okay thankfully. 👍🏻
 

Sportsman

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I wish I could argue with you. What makes it worse is that I have a medical background and knew about all of the things you mention. To add insult to injury, I used to teach cold water survival and rescue to crew of rescue ships in the North sea. Like I said, I should have known better.
What can I say in my defense?
All of my life I have been very active and very physical I have worked in remote and inhospitable places and have always accepted a degree of risk.
Now I am old and frail, but my brain hasn't quite accepted the reality. It still thinks I am 35 and invincible. On that particular day the forecast was for 9'C and I was dressed perfectly adequately for those temps. It was cold when I got there, but I expected it to warm up. It didn't. Getting cold is a bit like getting drunk. As you cool down your critical decision making ability deteriorates. Yes, I should have packed up sooner, but by then I was the last person to appreciate the fact. That's why I said cold is sneaky. I felt fine, until I started to move around and pack up.
Having said that, no excuses, I, of all people, should have known better.
So, the future. I have ordered some proper thermal gear. I will only go fishing again in company. I will be more aware of my feelings and surroundings.
Will it stop me from getting out? Absolutely not. After my health problems I had a decision to make. Should I wrap myself in cotton wool and become an invalid, or should I get out and do my thing and the hell with the consequences?.
Getting out means that I could die, as I almost discovered the other day. If I wrap myself up and care only for my health I will also die, sad but true. Life is not survivable ;)
Do I want my last memory to be mist coming off the lake at dawn, or the faces of the other inmates of the care home?
I think most on here know the answer to that.
Stay safe
 

adriang

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Does indeed sound like the beginnings of hypothermia. You're aware, that is the main thing.
 

Dave Spence

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I went fishing yesterday, the first day of the cold snap. Temps between 0' -3'C and mist/freezing fog.
I thought I was properly prepared, but to be honest, I wasn't. I had my new Milo Pro B&B and jacket, which is waterproof and windproof, but not well insulated. The problem was I was not wearing enough of the right things underneath it.
I fished from 10.00h-14.30h and, tbh, didn't feel particularly cold. My feet were cold, but no shivering or teeth chattering. It was only when I stopped that I noticed how bad I felt, I was staggering and when I bent down to put my pole in the holdall I just fell forwards. I was sluggish and disoriented and still had a 45 min drive to get home. I was also alone.
I decided to get into my car and get the heater on, but it was over 30 minutes before I felt even close to normal, let alone fit enough to drive. I finally drove home with no issues, but was I impaired? without a doubt, luckily the roads here are very quiet.
On reflection, I almost certainly suffered a low grade slow onset hypothermia, the type that can creep up on you without you really noticing, especially as you get older. I am 73 with a history of two strokes and a heart condition, along with poor circulation to the extremities, so I am a perfect candidate and should have known better.
A timely reminder, especially for our more mature members:
Don't overdo it and fish for too long. Stop if you start to feel strange.
Dress adequately, proper preparation. Food and hot drinks.
When I fell over I was close to the edge of the lake. Had I fallen in I would have died, there was no one else around.
If you start to feel bad, get into shelter, car or building, and rewarm.
Use your phone to get help if you have to and do it now. You might not be able to later. Looking back, it is what I should have done.
Enjoy your fishing, but be aware, cold is sneaky and can kill you (y)
Great advice Dave, I am so pleased that you got home safely. As you say, lessons learned. It is always better if you can have a travelling companion but, if this is not possible, at least have a tracker on your phone and ensure that someone knows what time you can be expected to return.
 

Dropon

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Jan 25, 2020
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Very much like the O P I went fishing on a coltish day last February, felt fine whilst fishing but when it came to working the 50 or so yards to the car it was very hard work. Car loaded and I got in after a struggle,drove home unpackEd the gear, inside and had evening meal. So I decided to have a bath ( usually shower ) problem was when I wanted to get out the bath I couldn’t get out , wife tried but no luck . Long story but after 2 hours trying wife said I’ll have get help, phoned for assistance and ambulance arrived ,they got me out . Got dried and put dressing gown on, ambulance folk then said we will do some tests, all ok I said when they had finished , no they said ,we will ring the duty Dr who wanted me to be admitted to hospital to which I said no . The ambulance folk stayed about a hour continuing tests. So to got long story short do be careful in the colder months, I seem to have just seized up. Be careful folks, especially when more mature.
 

Paul Cresswell

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I have a medical condition which means I’m not great on my feet. Getting cold makes it worse and increases the risk. I have heated clothing (gilet and socks) which helps a lot on cold days as well as good layering. I also have an Apple Watch so if I fall I can make a call without having to get my phone out (often under several layers) and I can simply ask the watch to call someone/help. In winter it’s not uncommon for me to be at a venue and the only person there. It’s an Apple Watch 4 (3 years old) and it has something called fall detection - if I have a heavy fall it asks me a question if I don’t respond it starts contacting people, don’t know if it works when you fall in but does for a heavy fall on the bank.
The things I have aren’t cheap and I appreciate not everyone can afford them, but they reduce the risks I face winter fishing and mean I can fish more.
 

Castlefisher

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Much food for thought here. And good advice.
I fished yesterday when the wind was NE.
Usual favoured pegs would have been on the end of that wind.
I fished the sheltered end, with the sun on me. Was warmer than last week.
I too am elderly, and I pick my swims now for comfort, before considering where the best fishing might be.
The first winter rule!
Also, I have invested in one of those electric heated base layers. Switch it on and off as required. I still had plenty of other layers on.
But for just over 100 notes, that heated thingy is just what I need
 

alsur

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Must admit I feel the cold much more than I did when I was younger, like most people here I've fished in some awful weather snow and ice and worse still bitterly cold winds. Now I choose when I go carefully and once it gets really cold I do something else, one of the good things about being retired is I can take advantage of better conditions.
 
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