Chrysoidine

Zerkalo

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 4, 2019
Messages
19,257
Sign up in a tackle shop I've started using saying "Please be aware - our bronze maggots use Chrysoidine".

I thought it was no longer used and don't seem to see bronze maggots for sale many places now. Tempted to get a pint mixed with 2 reds for tomorrow.
 

Dave

Red Leader
Staff member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 8, 2001
Messages
74,616
So did I as it was potentially carcinogenic
 

Zerkalo

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 4, 2019
Messages
19,257
I said that to my dad, causes cancer. He joked just don't put them in your mouth. Is it worth the risk though? I'll probably get a pint and try to drop it into conversation.
 

Ken the Pacman

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 24, 2015
Messages
4,317
It was never actually banned although the NFA fuelled by vested interests tried very hard and lost unlike lead shot which they did have banned.
Its mostly used for dying cardboard these days and is available commercially.
It was thought to be linked with cancer by association as all aniline based dyes including red yellow etc. are derived from Benzine which is carcinogenic so guilty by association really.
 

Zerkalo

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 4, 2019
Messages
19,257
They didn't have any bronze in but he said they sell them when it's river season, he did however have the next best thing... yellows.

2022-05-11 15.53.27.jpg
 

paul m

Member
Joined
Oct 7, 2021
Messages
26
Wasn’t it the late,great Clive Smith who died of bladder cancer; linked to chrysodine? I can remember me and my boss having yellow forearms on a Monday morning,and having to wash in bleach; we were / are butchers,and it didn’t look good. We piled bronze maggots in by the gallon on the Trent back then.
 

Ken the Pacman

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 24, 2015
Messages
4,317
Reds and Yellows are colour fed same as most other coloured maggots except bronze which are surface dyed but the Auromine or Rhodamine dyes used mostly are still from the same group of dyes as Chrysoidine.
 

Carmody

Regular member
Joined
Feb 24, 2017
Messages
1,278
I’m shocked that bronze maggots are still being dyed with Chrysoidine. I thought it was banned decades ago?
 

TiggerXFM

Regular member
Joined
Sep 26, 2021
Messages
2,051
I’m shocked that bronze maggots are still being dyed with Chrysoidine. I thought it was banned decades ago?
They showed me how they use the chrysoidine in my local tackle shop. The chrysoidine comes in a tin, very much like a paint tin. The shop staff simply added a couple of spoon fulls of the stuff to a container of white maggots and shook them about until it coverd them. The chrysiodine reminded me of metal filings in appearance.
I never use bronze maggots, except for one time the young shop assistant did me a favour and gave me a load of last weeks mixed maggots. There where bronze maggots mixed in them and the dye ruined my white stradic reel and I was lucky to get most of it off my rod handle corks.
My hands were yellow for over a week after that!
 

Carmody

Regular member
Joined
Feb 24, 2017
Messages
1,278
Well I’m not buying any more bronze maggots - even though my hands were permanently orange back in the 70’s and I’m still here (just)
 

Zerkalo

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 4, 2019
Messages
19,257
Interesting stuff. I'm going to at least try them again come river season. I remember fishing the Warks Avon as a kid and buying them and covering them with Turmeric as I'd read somewhere, probably the AT, that it was a good thing to do... never caught much mind!
 

TrickyD

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Messages
5,564
Interesting stuff. I'm going to at least try them again come river season. I remember fishing the Warks Avon as a kid and buying them and covering them with Turmeric as I'd read somewhere, probably the AT, that it was a good thing to do... never caught much mind!
Perhaps wearing latex gloves may help.
 

Louis D

Regular member
Joined
Aug 24, 2015
Messages
350
It was thought to be linked with cancer by association as all aniline based dyes including red yellow etc. are derived from Benzine which is carcinogenic so guilty by association really.
Nothing to do with benzene. Both the aniline and azo functionalities present in chrysoidine and other azo dyes are genotoxic flags for health agencies such as MHRA and FDA. I doubt people using it to dye maggots are taking precautions such as gloves or face mask so plenty of scope for skin exposure and inhalation. Anyone who knowingly uses it to get a 'better' bronze colour is a fool playing the odds with their health. Not everyone using it will get cancer but why take the risk to potentially catch a few more fish. I guess the fact that reaching for a ciggie first thing in the morning is still popular means we shouldn't really be surprised.
 

Ken the Pacman

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 24, 2015
Messages
4,317
The information came from ICI who made the stuff originally but the current version is Methyl Orange.
 

Louis D

Regular member
Joined
Aug 24, 2015
Messages
350
Methyl orange is very similar to chrysoidine, it has the same structural flags and some associated suspicions. You really have to believe in bronze maggots to use them. I'd rather have another 5-10 years but maybe I'm the minority.
 

nigel_briggs

Member
Joined
Jul 17, 2018
Messages
22
I still use bronze maggots on the river. I always riddle them off and put fresh maize meal in a couple of times before using, stops the orange fingers.
 
Top