Child life expectancy

corkycat

Regular member
Joined
Dec 2, 2018
Messages
300
Read the article yesterday about life expectancy projections being revised. Apparently a baby girl born today can now only expect to live (on average) to the age of 90.3 years. Only 90? I recall as a kid in 1950s Bolton I once asked my mum how long people live for. I distinctly remember her reply: "73 for women and 69 for men". Crikey, 69! But then when I really think about it, back then it seemed half of the male population of the town had silicosis, emphysema, or some or other lung or heart disease. Aye. Things were better in my day.
 

Trogg

the bouncer
Staff member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 11, 2001
Messages
28,181
I was happy when i celebrated my 43rd birthday, everybody says i take after my dad in everyway except looks (i take after the Romany side for looks :) )

My dad died at 42, so i wanted to celebrate my 43rd year and i did, then again i was told i'd be dead at 21 by my dr and he was wrong, if i live as long as my grandad did even after beating cancer 7 times and "letting" it kill him on it's 8th attempt i'll be amazed... he lived to 92, when i think about what has happened in my lifetime so far i can't even imagine what wonders humans will be up to in 45yrs time!
 

Sam Vimes

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 27, 2009
Messages
5,548
Both my great grandmother and her daughter (my recently departed grandmother) lived to over one hundred. I really, really, don't want to hang around that long. At least twenty years less will do me just fine. Fortunately, such longevity is not a big feature of the males of the family.
 

Wise Owl

Regular member
Account Locked
Joined
Mar 29, 2015
Messages
39,733
The thing i see is having a good woman is a key to an easy Life, i remember when me and our Gert got together nearly 34 year ago i was wild and though i wont see 40, 20 years ago i had a bit of a scare that made me think Mmmmmmmmmmmmm carry on like this and ya wont. Change in Boozing, stopped smoking, cut out the saying see ya friday and hello Sundays and im fighting fit. Now im not saying i was a bad Father or Husband just a Mad one and having a Gert who stood by me made it easy.
 

Dave

Red Leader
Staff member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 8, 2001
Messages
65,313
Living to a ripe old age is fine as long as you have your health and faculties.

My elderly neighbours (M97, F94) are both bed bound, have full-time carers with them, she doesn't know what day it is or recognise anyone, no dignity, he has been bedbound for a year now, still has some recognition but no dignity.
Effectively both 'heads on beds', zero to live for, absolutely no quality of life, but kept alive.

Seriously, you would be dragged in front of the courts if you treat animals in the same way.
 

62tucker

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Messages
14,299
Living to a ripe old age is fine as long as you have your health and faculties.

My elderly neighbours (M97, F94) are both bed bound, have full-time carers with them, she doesn't know what day it is or recognise anyone, no dignity, he has been bedbound for a year now, still has some recognition but no dignity.
Effectively both 'heads on beds', zero to live for, absolutely no quality of life, but kept alive.

Seriously, you would be dragged in front of the courts if you treat animals in the same way.
Crazy in my eye. The NHS must spend more on the average person in the last 6 months of their lives than in the previous all their years
. Keeping people alive for no reason = a skint NHS.
 

Dave

Red Leader
Staff member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 8, 2001
Messages
65,313
Precisely!

I see their family coming and going throughout the week, there is nothing they can do to make the situation any easier on the couple or themselves, and bearing in mind the couple's immediate family are in their 60's/70's with their own health issues, it is devastating for them.
 

The Landlord

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 26, 2018
Messages
4,018
I was happy when i celebrated my 43rd birthday, everybody says i take after my dad in everyway except looks (i take after the Romany side for looks :) )

My dad died at 42, so i wanted to celebrate my 43rd year and i did, then again i was told i'd be dead at 21 by my dr and he was wrong, if i live as long as my grandad did even after beating cancer 7 times and "letting" it kill him on it's 8th attempt i'll be amazed... he lived to 92, when i think about what has happened in my lifetime so far i can't even imagine what wonders humans will be up to in 45yrs time!
Similar with me. Dad died at 58 so I was quite pleased to pass that milestone. Most of his family died in their 60's whereas my mum's family are all long living. late 80's & mid 90's.. even my Auntie lived to 104 !!
 

62tucker

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Messages
14,299
We need a serious discussion on end of life care. I am sure if you have been in a situation where your sitting next to a parent or loved and waiting for them to die for days or even weeks and a quick injection can put them out of pain with loved ones around them we would all go for that.
And save billions for nhs. Extra beds, extra nurses.
Agreement signed by 2 doctors and next of kin.
 

Neil ofthe nene

Doing things differently.
Site Supporter
Joined
May 4, 2009
Messages
22,362
It is said that for every day you live you add six minutes onto your life expectancy due to advances in medicine.
 

frankg

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2010
Messages
1,353
We need a serious discussion on end of life care. I am sure if you have been in a situation where your sitting next to a parent or loved and waiting for them to die for days or even weeks and a quick injection can put them out of pain with loved ones around them we would all go for that.
And save billions for nhs. Extra beds, extra nurses.
Agreement signed by 2 doctors and next of kin.

Yes we do need that conversation...but......it's a minefield! There are many pieces of scum out there that would happily hasten their parents / relatives end of life just to get their hands on money or property!
One way of discouraging that risk would be to say that anyone convicted of ending the lives of parents or relatives for personal gain and greed, would also be euthanised (y)
 

62tucker

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Messages
14,299
It is said that for every day you live you add six minutes onto your life expectancy due to advances in medicine.
My final salary pensions scheme was scrapped because of longer life expectancy. If they saying someone born today will live till their 90. If they reach 60 their life expectancy will be higher than 90. If you know what I mean.
Well that’s what we were told.
In the area where I worked the north east for argument sake say life expectancy was 80. But they worked out if you get to retire at 62 your life expectancy was 85. So pension deficit went from £80million to £600 million so they closed the scheme. Not exact figure but hopefully u get the drift
 

Neil ofthe nene

Doing things differently.
Site Supporter
Joined
May 4, 2009
Messages
22,362
That argument about longer life expectancy and pensions is a complete load of Bull. And it is the same reason Annuities are a con.

The point about a Pension or Annuity scheme is that by the time you retire a "pot" of money has been built up that when invested will provide sufficient income to pay the pension. That pot of money will continue to provide investment income as long as the money remains invested. So it matters not how long the pensioner lives. Inflation, interest rates and dividend yield will dictate how much income is derived from the investment. But the pension managers will have a fair idea what interest rates etc. will do and thus will make prudent investments to even out any future fluctuations.

Then of course there is the capital appreciation. So when a pensioner or annuity recipient dies the capital stays with the provider and will or should be worth more than when the pension was initially taken. That capital is then used to provide part of the pot for future pensioners and so it rolls on.

I have an investment inherited from my late mother. The initial investment was made in 2004. It provided an annual income of 5% of the initial investment plus the capital growth. That investment has paid that 5% ever since and the capital is now worth some 50% more than the original amount. Yes the monthly income has remained fixed for 16 years and so in real terms has fallen in value. But were I to slice off and liquidate the growth I could invest that and add 50% to the annual income. I have to believe that Pension and Annuity managers are savvy enough to do even better than my late mother.
 

Sportsman

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
May 9, 2008
Messages
7,745
A lot of life expectancy figures were skewed by the increased child mortality. Many more children died in childhood from what would now be ordinary childhood illnesses. If you survived into adulthood you could probably live a reasonable life.
 

nejohn

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 1, 2013
Messages
5,495
At 59 I am the oldest serviving male in my family for 4 generartions, granted my grandfather was killed in north africa in 1940 but his father died at 47, my farther died of a heart attack aged 54, my older brother died of cancer aged 52 on my mothers side her brother died of cancer at 58 and her farther died of 'natural causes' aged 48 also......so I am now probably on borrowed time..!!
 

Trogg

the bouncer
Staff member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 11, 2001
Messages
28,181
One way of discouraging that risk would be to say that anyone convicted of ending the lives of parents or relatives for personal gain and greed, would also be euthanised (y)

I like that idea Frank, if they were also euthanised we'd also save on any benefits, pensions, NHS costs etc they would have taken up!
 
Top