Charging car batteries

Philocalist

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Just been gifted a 'new unused' battery, problem being that immediately after purchase it was charged, and then has been sat on the floor in a garage unused ever since - for at least 6 years, and likely a few more than that :D It's not actually a car battery as such, but one of the ones classed as a 'leisure' battery (think its rated at 105aH rather than the usually 75aH-ish), typically used in caravans, or to power an electric boat motor etc.
Apparently the battery (a Bosch one) is immaculate, and has been stored dry throughout, but collection involves a round trip of at least 2 hours, and I'm wondering whether it may be a waste of time? I can certainly put it to good use if it's still OK. but the lass getting rid knows nothing more, and would be unable to do any sort of testing from her end.
Has anyone any thoughts, preferably from experience? I'd be gob-smacked if there was any charge left in there, but in any event, is this still going to take and hold a charge after all this time, or am I more likely to be simply collecting a very heavy doorstop?
 

stikflote

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MY 12volt batterys on my bikes have to kept on charge ,a lot of tools with batterys have to have charge ever so often
other wise they Fail,

but if its kept in the dry and has not been frozen then it might be ok
 

Knfruitbat

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If it is a leisure battery it is probably not suitable for a car even if in tip top condition. Car batteries need sudden instant power to start vehicles, but caravan batteries are for longer lower power requirements. Only way to know is get a good charger on it that also checks and reconditions the battery if salvagable. Also need to check type of battery and if it is suitable for what you have in mind for use, you can check on a decent caravan or mobile home site or shop for the different types of battery and their usability.
 

satinet

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Personally I wouldn't drive 2 hours to get it. Too much chance of it being knackered. Guess the scrap value would pay towards your fuel though.
 

juttle

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If it is a leisure battery it is probably not suitable for a car even if in tip top condition. Car batteries need sudden instant power to start vehicles, but caravan batteries are for longer lower power requirements. Only way to know is get a good charger on it that also checks and reconditions the battery if salvagable. Also need to check type of battery and if it is suitable for what you have in mind for use, you can check on a decent caravan or mobile home site or shop for the different types of battery and their usability.

As above. If it’s a leisure battery it won’t be any use as a standard car battery as it won’t have the cranking power to turn the engine over. If you’re running a van you could use it for internal lighting, or charging stuff up or running any 12 volt stuff you’ve got. You’d need a split charging system installed in the vehicle to keep it charged up however. If you’re not already geared up to use a leisure battery it’s a lot of hassle!
 

Philocalist

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No intention at all of trying to use this in a car guys - it's more likely to end up powering an electric outboard or trolling motor - I'm more interested in this stage whether the journey is likely to be worth it - what the chances are of me having a usable battery that would cost me well over £100 otherwise, free, or just a large heavy lump to dispose of?
 

Trogg

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No intention at all of trying to use this in a car guys - it's more likely to end up powering an electric outboard or trolling motor - I'm more interested in this stage whether the journey is likely to be worth it - what the chances are of me having a usable battery that would cost me well over £100 otherwise, free, or just a large heavy lump to dispose of?


I have an electric outboard, i use a small gell battery to power it, i did use my leisure battery but it was big and heavy
The gell one is a golf cart one and lasts just as long when using it carefully, i paid around £50 for it.
 

juttle

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If it’s going to cost you £100 to collect it - don’t!

If it’s very cheap or even a freebie it’s bound to be bu99ered so leave it where it is!
 

Markywhizz

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I know from our many years owning a narrowboat if you don’t recharge a leisure battery at least every couple of months it becomes useless. They are a lot more sensitive than car batteries.
 
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