Casting Weights of Rods & Feeders

Maverick

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jun 2, 2012
Messages
1,771
If a rod has a casting weight of 60g is that the heaviest weight including bait that the rod can safely cast without snapping, or is the reccommended weight to load the blank correctly for optimum casting distance.

I was trying some feeders out over the last few days. When I used a 32g medium feeder I was struggling to hit the clip at a set distance. Now It seemed obvious to put a heavier feeder on to get the extra distance required.

This had an adverse effect and in fact putting a smaller 24g feeder on got me hitting the distance everytime. I guess its a bit like you can throw a pebble much further than you can throw a house brick.

Also putting a 42g/45g feeder on this rod made it feel like I was trying to cast a house brick and I was holding back for fear of hearing a load crack.

Can anyone explain in simple terms whats going on here?
 

Mike atkinson

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Nov 22, 2013
Messages
1,176
Casting weight should only be taken as a guide,, you know by useing a rod, what it’s comfortable at chucking, and at what point, you lose your accuracy, I have two rods that I could name, both top end rods, one has a casting weight of 40grams, one is 60grams, yet there’s nothing between them,,
 

ukzero1

Growing old disgracefully.
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 3, 2004
Messages
14,993
If a feeder rod has a casting weight of 40gr (for example), then that is with feeder fully loaded. Load up a 20/25gr medium size feeder and you won't be far off it's 40gr limit.
 

richox12

Regular member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
2,342
It's just a guide. It doesn't mean you won't break it casting at or under the specified weight. Depends on you and your technique. Same with line ratings and pole elastic ratings. All guides. Not set in stone.
 

nejohn

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 1, 2013
Messages
5,497
I am with Mike on this one casting weights are like line ratings and should only be used as a guide, personally I will only use them to compare rods from the same range ie if one rod in the range has a casting weight of 40g and another has a casting weight of 80g that tells me that the 80g rod is a lump beefier than the 40g rod. Once you start comparing rods from different ranges and manufacturers it then all becomes guess work as there is no industry standard as to how to rate a rod ....I am very much of the opinion that if it looks and feels right then it probably is right. Until there are standards of how rods are rated then there will be no substitute for picking one up and giving it a good old fashioned waggle
 

rd115

Non-catcher of Barbel
Site Supporter
Joined
May 30, 2019
Messages
2,061
I always go about 10g under when choosing a feeder, the bait takes it over but i find it confortable.

my 10ft Yank n Bank has a 40g casting weight and i use a 30g large method feeder and doesn't feel like the rod is overdoing it when it's loaded with bait.
 

Silverfisher

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 10, 2019
Messages
9,257
I always go about 10g under when choosing a feeder, the bait takes it over but i find it confortable.

That’s sort my policy as well as they rarely feel good at the top end of the rating. My acolyte ultra is rated to 40g but it casts best with a 15-25g feeders and starts to feel a bit heavy with 30g so I certainly wouldn’t use 40g for anything more than a short under arm chuck.
 
Top