Casting And Feeding To A Clip In Deep Water

dry nets

apprentice stormtrooper
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Reading this and I’d say 5 out of 4 people struggle with maths.🤣
why don’t you just make the spot a 10ft circle. Simples
 

rd115

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Could take a leaf from the barbel guys and use a spopper. Basically a spod modified into a bait dropper so it dumps the bait onto the bottom.

Clip both rods up same amount of wraps and the bait will always be dropped far nearer your hook bait than you could ever manage with a normal spod.
 

Deejay8

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If you are casting into deep water should cast and then raise the rod, before it hits the clip.I always raised it to the 2 O'clock position, but I've seen anglers pull it back behind them to 11 O'clock. And then lower the rod tip as the feeder sinks, and you should minimise the arcing back of the feeder.
Rather than using a spod that empties the bait when it hits the water, why not get extra feed in by using a baiting up feeder to get the feed down to the bottom. If it weighs the same as your method feeder it will bring the bait to the same spot on the lake bed.
It is possible to exploit the fact that some feed will fall out of the feeder beyond it's final position on the lake bed. If you have got your groundbait mix correct, most of your bait will hit bottom on the feeder. But if some is falling further out, then after catching a few fish, you may find that the fish back off over the spilled bait. You can target these fish by unclipping and adding a small amount of distance before reclipping, or if it's only a small distance, put a heavier feeder on, which will stretch the line a little more and reach a few inches further.
 

gingert76

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other thing you can do if you want to bait over the top is either use PVA with a oil in it and you will soon see it on the surface, even easier on a windy day) and or you can you a marker and cast on a clip to see how much distance it heads back to you in teh deep water when you let it pop up again.
 

robert d

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I made a thread about clipping up in deep water before, and other than hitting the clip with the rod behind you to compensate, I was told via a diagram that the arc would be minimal anyway, not 5 yards more like a couple of foot. I always clip up now and don't feel as though the arc makes a difference, and that's with an open end feeder, I'd assume with a method feeder you're hoping your bait is still in tact on the feeder so would make even less of a difference in that sense. I don't spomb though, I use a catapult if I'm going to loose feed and you get a natural spread from that anyway.
I watch a lot of videos on you tube ,most people i see fish past the feed about a meter , otherwise id go with cast with a feed feeder or just cast out about 6 or 7 times with normal feeder .
 

grey

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If you are casting into deep water should cast and then raise the rod, before it hits the clip.I always raised it to the 2 O'clock position, but I've seen anglers pull it back behind them to 11 O'clock. And then lower the rod tip as the feeder sinks, and you should minimise the arcing back of the feeder.
That's how I do it - pull back and follow the feeder down.

Sometimes this isn't practical, in which case I'll mark the line with a stop-knot and leave the tags long - so when it rattles the first guides, I jam my finger against the spool to stop the feeder and release the line when the feeder hits the water to let it fall straight down. Bit 'old-skool', so requires a little practice, but you soon find the rhythm.
 

martin22

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I think your overthinking it to much,at that depth the ark back will be minimal probably less than your casting accuracy,you don’t want to be to accurate anyway because if you draw to many fish into too tight of an area you’ll just keep getting liners
Regard to loose feed if the fish want it that way (it’s the fish that dictate how they want to be fed) then swap to a lightly packed fine wire cage feeder that will start breaking down as soon as it hits the water and cast more regularly
 

Deejay8

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Won't it only arc if you keep your rod up high? 🤔
You don't keep the rod tip high until the feeder hits the bottom. You cast and pull the rod back to the high position and wait for it to hit the clip. That gives you more line between the rod tip and the feeder. You then drop the rod tip as soon as you feel it hit the clip,following the feeder down with the line slack until it hits the deck.That way it isn't swinging in an arc towards you.Once it's on the deck you tighten up to the tip.
 

Deejay8

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I think your overthinking it to much,at that depth the ark back will be minimal probably less than your casting accuracy,you don’t want to be to accurate anyway because if you draw to many fish into too tight of an area you’ll just keep getting liners
Regard to loose feed if the fish want it that way (it’s the fish that dictate how they want to be fed) then swap to a lightly packed fine wire cage feeder that will start breaking down as soon as it hits the water and cast more regularly
If I want to have the bait in a small area on the deck, I'd use a traditional plastic open end feeder. That would see minimal bait falling out on the way down and any arcing of the feeder wouldn't matter. If I wanted a bed of bait spread a bit wider, which is often better, for the reasons you give, then I would use a cage feeder as you suggest. I tend to hit the clip at 2 O'clock, because it's how I saw some top feeder matchmen doing it. You do have to be an accurate caster so you don't pull the feeder out of line when it hits the clip.
 

Dave Spence

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I'm having a bit of a chuckle here, I'm imagining a huge shoal of bream having to form a queue to get to a saucer diameter pile of food. Don't get hung up on trivia, spread it about a bit.
 

robert d

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I'm having a bit of a chuckle here, I'm imagining a huge shoal of bream having to form a queue to get to a saucer diameter pile of food. Don't get hung up on trivia, spread it about a bit.
Yes not too tight ,as i said before a lot fish past the baited area or to the side about a meter or so usually past .
 

mattnewark

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Having watched a few more underwater videos, I'm not overly concerned to be honest. I'm certainly going to try and keep the casting consistent, hitting the clip in similar fashion etc.

Amazed how a few spods of bait on the deck look, as it barely looks like anything has gone in.
 

Fishinmaddad

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You don't keep the rod tip high until the feeder hits the bottom. You cast and pull the rod back to the high position and wait for it to hit the clip. That gives you more line between the rod tip and the feeder. You then drop the rod tip as soon as you feel it hit the clip,following the feeder down with the line slack until it hits the deck.That way it isn't swinging in an arc towards you.Once it's on the deck you tighten up to the tip.
Hi mate yes I understand the theory, that's what my point was. You explained it better than I could tho. Lol 👍🏻
 
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