Can you keep trout?

Lee Richards

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2019
Messages
12,405
Spot on there Dave.
I caught an 11lb Severn Pike many years ago and despite best efforts it died from being gullet hooked,

Friend of a friend who is a good chef prepared it for me in a garlic and white wine sauce.

It tasted s**t and so Earthy I might as well have had a plate of silt.
 

qtaran111

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Sep 29, 2015
Messages
640
It’s also worth bearing in mind whether it’s safe, not just taste. Where I fish it’s easy to catch trout over the 25cm limit and although the river is now relatively clean, the silt has high levels of heavy metal contamination from its industrial past. That combined with bioaccumulation means you’d be mad as a hatter (pun intended) to eat anything from there.
 

BarryS

Gone fishing
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 24, 2020
Messages
592
That would make sense. Only places I’ve caught brown trout are the Itchen and Wye and the size difference is quite marked. Almost every Itchen trout I’ve had has been in the pound to a couple pounds range save for the odd session where lots have ranged from half a pound to a pound but on the Wye they’ve always been in that smaller bracket.
Having had a half ticket on the test many years ago....my guess is that a lot of the larger fish in rivers like the Test and the Itchen would have been stocked.I've always been happy to release trout carefully where rules allow it.
 

mike fox

'Just Me and the Fish'
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 5, 2011
Messages
2,756
It’s also worth bearing in mind whether it’s safe, not just taste. Where I fish it’s easy to catch trout over the 25cm limit and although the river is now relatively clean, the silt has high levels of heavy metal contamination from its industrial past. That combined with bioaccumulation means you’d be mad as a hatter (pun intended) to eat anything from there.
Absolutely. Just because a river contains trout and grayling many people think the river is healthy and the fish are edible. The problem is toxins from any form of past polution stays within the silt and substrate which is the home to the fishes main food source. The toxins are absorbed by these creatures and ingested by the fish. Relatively harmless to the fish they maybe and also to humans when the fish is cooked properly, but I wouldn't like to risk the health of myself or family. If you want to eat trout, eat the farmed trout from a stocked still water but they still need a good dose of seasoning. Gone are the days when we could catch wild trout from any UK river and enjoy their fresh taste. Chalk stream trout are ok because the water is cleaner but even then many of these rivers have unacceptably high levels of sewage discharge pooring in to them.
 

Dave

Red Leader
Staff member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 8, 2001
Messages
74,616
Wasnt it back in the 80's when reports were coming out of Barbel in the Trent having high levels of hormone drugs which was having an effect on the fertility of male Barbel. The drugs were linked to the contraceptive pill and water treatment plants not having the ability to remove it from waste water before discharging into the river.

Hands on hips, would you really want to eat a fish out of UK rivers, sweethearts ? 🥰
 

Total

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 25, 2016
Messages
22,751
Wasnt it back in the 80's when reports were coming out of Barbel in the Trent having high levels of hormone drugs which was having an effect on the fertility of male Barbel. The drugs were linked to the contraceptive pill and water treatment plants not having the ability to remove it from waste water before discharging into the river.

Hands on hips, would you really want to eat a fish out of UK rivers, sweethearts ? 🥰
I don't think there was any truth in it....:oops:


sassy rod caster small.gif
 

Lee Richards

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2019
Messages
12,405
Also in the 80s/90s Barbel in the Hampshire Avon and Kennet were being caught with additional pairs of barbules.
This was attributed to the volume of meat being put into the water.

Fish and other aquatic life seem quick to take on any contaminates or changes through food sources.
 

TiggerXFM

Regular member
Joined
Sep 26, 2021
Messages
2,051
Absolutely. Just because a river contains trout and grayling many people think the river is healthy and the fish are edible. The problem is toxins from any form of past polution stays within the silt and substrate which is the home to the fishes main food source. The toxins are absorbed by these creatures and ingested by the fish. Relatively harmless to the fish they maybe and also to humans when the fish is cooked properly, but I wouldn't like to risk the health of myself or family. If you want to eat trout, eat the farmed trout from a stocked still water but they still need a good dose of seasoning. Gone are the days when we could catch wild trout from any UK river and enjoy their fresh taste. Chalk stream trout are ok because the water is cleaner but even then many of these rivers have unacceptably high levels of sewage discharge pooring in to them.
A lot of uk rivers have high levels of mercury in the substrate and once injested it never leaves the body, so there is not a chance that I would eat a fish from any uk river unless it was caught as close as possible to the rivers source. Then you would most likely be talking very small brook trout so not even worth the faffing about!
After saying that, there is still a lot of nuclear fall out from chernobyl on the hill tops and apparently meat from these places is still not fit to be consumed!
At least with sea fish the pollution is less concentrated 🙄.
 
Top