Brickwork

62tucker

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Came across this on you tube. Poor brickwork. But another got me was the stud walls when they walked into a house. Looked 3 to 4 ft centres. Is that the norm nowadays. Sure it used to be 18 inch or 24 inch

 

Wise Owl

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The bricklaying ait bad its the compo that aint been cleaned from splashes when dropped on the scaffold lift. The stud work is how they see it ample if using half inch boards. Me i wouldnt buy a new house with given money the old saying is " you can put lipstick on a pig, its still a pig".
 

mickthechippy

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studwork standard spacing is 400mm centres or 16 inches approx, and nogged at 600mm vertically

anything over that is poo work
 

Wise Owl

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Mick i went to price the last house on a little cul de sac the studs were 600 centres, i asked and they said 8X4 boards mate not a problem.
 

brian carragher

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I could only watch for 3.5 minutes, couldnt do any more ignorance and stupidity than that

The videoer clearly hasnt got a clue what he's talking about

As for centres , if its standard 70mm tin its at 600mm centres, reduces if its jumbo stud but its not normally used in house bashing
 

Zerkalo

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I know nothing about bricklaying or housebuilding but am in and out of newbuilds all day and they do seem shoddy, the ones in the video especially.
 

mickthechippy

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a couple of years back, I was the general foreman on a new build timber framed site of 6 bungalows and a warden 3 bed house

on completion, I had to join the contracting companys clerk of works on the final inspection of the built properties before handover

it went well, and we sat down to agree or disagree on the extra costings, adaptations etc, for the final payments

during the conversation, I asked him, as they were built as rental properties, how long it would take for the association to get their outlaid costs back, and when would a profit show

he explained that the rents were costed at that time for a twenty five year period,

but and its a big but, the design of the homes ( assisted living bungalows) was only projected to have a 30 year life span

thats when I realised, new builds aint worth a toss
 

Wise Owl

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My house is over a 100 year old and will still be standing when them rubbish new builds are in a Landfill.
 

mickthechippy

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If you wish to purchase a property

try to find a ex council house built after 1945, up till the early 1970's

the standards are far superior built wise than anything before or after,

all were built to a govenment regulated set of plans out of proper materials, with standardisation of window and door sizes
 

Dave

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I would not touch a timber framed house in this country if it was the only thing on offer

Having seen 5 year old windows ready to fall out due to rot, fascias and soffits rotted through in less time, and knowing that most timber available nowadays is green and soft, our climate is not suitable. Once the framework is enclosed the damp is in effect trapped in and it's debatable which will happen first - the damp will evaporate through the 'breathable' membrane, or it'll soak into the wood and start rot
 

mickthechippy

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I would not touch a timber framed house in this country if it was the only thing on offer

Having seen 5 year old windows ready to fall out due to rot, fascias and soffits rotted through in less time, and knowing that most timber available nowadays is green and soft, our climate is not suitable. Once the framework is enclosed the damp is in effect trapped in and it's debatable which will happen first - the damp will evaporate through the 'breathable' membrane, or it'll soak into the wood and start rot

fast grown spruce, tis a poor substitute timber
 

Wise Owl

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All my walls have been replastered with sand Cement And waterproofed , all Ceilings Re boarded and skimmed, new airgrates cellar tanked its a brand new house in a old shell.
 

Wise Owl

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I didnt wanna upset ya mate thats why i didnt mention the Coloured stuff that goes on last :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
 

mickthechippy

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one of my houses deeds make me smile

it was built in 1879, by the south eastern railway

and states, for occupation by, "firemen and above only"
 

Gwillim

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After all the above comments i'm glad the house we just purchased is stone built with walls a half meter thick :) oh and solid stone not just faced with stone and rubble infill :)
 

Dave

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I've been back working on a 1730's cottage renovation today, and tomorrow and this weekend, and it's solid.
Some of the timbers are original such as the roof and there were recycled back then :eek:
 
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