Bream feeder - clipping up in deep water

Zerkalo

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I'm thinking about fishing a lake near me that I imagine to be reasonably deep - say 10 to 20 foot at a guess - it might be deeper in places. Groundbait feeder is going to be weapon of choice for the bream. Now first instinct would be to clip up - is this an issue in deeper water?

Watching the underwater video in the 'eye opener' thread got me thinking about where my bait is going to be landing and so it will be important to get the right groundbait mix I presume. So second question is about which groundbait you'd reccomend for feeder fishing for bream in that kind of depth?

And any other advice is welcome.
 

Tinca Steve

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In that type of depth l use marker braid X2 , two seperate knots that is and l cast listening for the knots to go through the rings at which point I use my finger to stop the cast and as the feeder hits the water l let it have free line with the tip of the rod under water, when it hits bottom l then tighten up careful not to move the feeder. If using a buzzer have your line to the side of the buzzer whilst tightening up put bobbin on then lift the rod at the buzzer to place the line correctly on the buzzer, this way you don't annoy any anglers around you. And don't forget you are the only one who needs to hear a run so keep the volume down please.
 
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Layers Mash. 20 Kilos £ 13. Free postage on eBay.

In my opinion this is one of the best baits for feeder fishing for Bream.

Buck.
 

Zerkalo

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Never used a buzzer so will be quiver tip as a lot of skimmers as well as the bream I think.

Reason I ask, I've had some disastrous days open end groundbait feeder fishing before. Wrong groundbait mix even though it says Bream on the bag, exploding as soon as it hits the water, clipping up as well, ending up with my feed metres away from my hookbait, just a total disaster!

Layers mash sounds interesting.
 

Stretch1066

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What distance are you thinking of fishing at, are you fishing the tip single rod or multiple buzzer set up?
First thing to do is have a cast around with a bomb rod and see if there are any features to cast to, or weeds to avoid, then make a plan as to were to fish.
 

Zerkalo

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Haven't fished it yet but it will be single rod tip. I'm guessing I'll be chucking about 40m. Always have a cast around first to try to work out the contours.
 

lp1886

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Use a sticky mix - otherwise the feeder will be empty way before it hits the bottom.

Find your distance and allow the feeder to hit the bottom before clipping up. When you next cast it will go past your spot, but will arc back towards you.

Be prepared to cast around the spot. From underwater videos I’ve seen (the Phil Ringer one is very good) it shows that once Bream know there is food about they will peck around over a massive area. There is honestly no need to keep dropping down the same hole.

What I have had better success doing when fishing less than 40metres is fishing the bomb, and introducing groundbait balls via a catapult. This way, i can leave the bait out longer rather than recasting every few minutes.
 

Stretch1066

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The most important thing for me is to hit the same spot every time. To achieve this you will need the right rod (length & power), reel (size), line (sinking),
various feeders (distance & type), all for the distance & depth your going to fish at, all of these will be personal preference to your casting style. Every body will have their own preferences so expect to get lots of different answers, mine are 13 ft distance rod, 4000 size reel, 8lb daiwa sensor line soaked in washing up liquid fished straight through, various feeders for the weather. You need to balance the tackle so that you can cast nice and easily, @ 40 mt its more than a lob, more of a cast but you should not be having to belt it out. Once you have decided were to fish cast out and clip up with an empty feeder or bomb, bear in mind now that when you hit the clip and place the rod, the feeder will drop in an arc and depending on depth will end up closer to you (this does not matter as long as you cast to the same place every time) Now, my way, cast out hit the clip and as soon as the feeder hits the water quickly move the rod just behind the rod rest (yes it does move the feeder towards you but it does not matter as long as you do the same thing every time) and put the tip under the water keeping the line tight, this helps to sink the line wait for the tip to bounce back as the feeder hit the bottom, lift the rod and gently winding at the same time place the rod on he rest, gently take the slack out of the line as it sinks, wait for a bite. There are many different end tackle set ups all of which will be down to personal preference.
 

richox12

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Once clipped up to wherever you want to be - cast out, immediately move rod back & behind your head, hit clip with rod right back behind you and then feather it down by moving the rod forwards & back over your head and so back to being in front of you. No arc (very little, depends on depth) that way and the drop of feeder is much more vertical. With a little practice you will be able to start moving the rod back to it's forward position as you hit the clip so it's a 'soft' hit and the feeder lands with a nice 'plop' not a great big splash..
 

nejohn

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I will cast out to my required spot, then tie a stop knot on my line just in front of the reel, then when I cast again when I hear the stop knot going through the rings I will stop the line with my finger on the spool and let the feeder fall through the water on a slack line, I then tighten up until the stop knots are on the spool. Then when I have a carpet of feed down I will thighten a little further so that my bait is resting towards my side of the bed to feed as I do not like bringing hooked bream through a feed ing shoal, would much rather take fewer fish from the edge of the shoal but hold the shoal over a longer period of time
 

SpenBeck

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If the bream are 'having it', then bites start to dry up. Be prepared to fire some extra balls of groundbait out over the area. Somethings just 1 feeder going in is not enough to hold them. This is what we do in Ireland.
 

Anglingman

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consistency of cast is key whether clipped up or not. Feeder should always end up in the same place even if falling in an arc on a tight line.
Groundbait mix must be right to ensure it doesn't come out until the feeder is on the deck otherwise you may have a carpet of bait spread about the size of the county.....
 

fasteddy

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Once clipped up to wherever you want to be - cast out, immediately move rod back & behind your head, hit clip with rod right back behind you and then feather it down by moving the rod forwards & back over your head and so back to being in front of you. No arc (very little, depends on depth) that way and the drop of feeder is much more vertical. With a little practice you will be able to start moving the rod back to it's forward position as you hit the clip so it's a 'soft' hit and the feeder lands with a nice 'plop' not a great big splash..
This.
 

Zerkalo

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Thanks for all the advice, plenty for me to work on when I finally get to fish where I'm planning to go.

It seems like my options are either not clipping up and using the knot method, or clipping or and paying attention to the rod position as the feeder hits and goes through the water. Both make good sense.

I'll have to see about the groundbait mix, experiment a bit with different mixes. And also maybe get some practise in with my catapult!
 

smiffy

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One thing to bear in mind is that you don’t want your feed landing in an area the size of a dinner plate. With Bream it can pay to be a bit inaccurate with line. It won’t matter if you’re a couple of yards either side of your marker. Distance is more important so I would clip up. Bream are no problem at all against a clip.
The feeder will fall in an arc in deeper water,gradually getting closer to you but if you’re fishing groundbait it’s not an issue.
Your mix wants to be quite dry so that the feeder empties just before or as soon as it hits the bottom. Sensas lake is a favourite of mine and good old brown crumb. A bit of VdE secret if I think I need a binder. Remember that your groundbait is only there to stop all the loose offerings falling out of the feeder?
 

Zerkalo

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I'll try Sensas lake, maybe mixed with a bit of something to bind it if needed as I was just saying in another thread, I bought a bag of Sensas Formula Supreme intended for Gudgeon on a canal and it FLOATED, even though it said gudgeon on the bag, and no matter how much I wet it. So I want something reasonably sticky to get down to the bottom at least.

I've been thinking that I'm maybe over thinking this, but I like being a thinking angler, and watching that underwater video in the eye opener thread made me question what is probably the most tied and tested method for catching Bream, so maybe I'm worrying a bit too much because as you say, Bream can shoal and feed over quite a wide area. I just like to imagine my hookbait near to my feed.
 

Simon R

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My go to groundbait for deep water is a 50/50 mix of VDE Secret and Supercup - Secret gives you the stickyness to prevent the feeder emptying before it hits the bottom and Supercup gives the attraction once it gets there.
Don't forget to pack plenty of particles in your groundbait too - casters, corn, pellets, squatts if you can get them - groundbait alone won't hold a shoal of feeding bream for long.
Use a larger feeder to start with and have a few quick casts to get some initial feed in, then switch to a standard size but keeping casting in regularly - every five minutes or so until you start getting bites - then the fish will dictate how often you cast (y)

Simon
 

Neil ofthe nene

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In that type of depth l use marker braid X2 , two seperate knots that is and l cast listening for the knots to go through the rings at which point I use my finger to stop the cast and as the feeder hits the water l let it have free line with the tip of the rod under water, when it hits bottom l then tighten up careful not to move the feeder.

Exactly my thoughts when I read the title. I use mono for the sliding knot on the main line but the result is the same.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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Yet again folk are over thinking there fishing , just go out there and have a session

As someone who likes to keep things simple I don't believe this is over thinking.

In theory, in 20ft of water the feeder could end up 20ft closer to the angler than where it hit the water. This could mean that with groundbait exiting the feeder on the drop a lot of feed could be spread over that 20ft and very little near the hookbait. It is such thinking that can make a difference between one angler catching and another not.

Another solution is to use an open ended feeder that has been taped up. Or taking a lesson from carp angling, using a PVA bag and a bomb instead of a feeder.
 
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