Bodied Wagglers

tipitinmick

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^^ And absolutely hopeless on venues with islands 20 metres plus away with a wind on.....:rolleyes:....I'll speak to our Nicky about your future tutoring....It seems our job is more difficult than we first thought...:p:D

I’m a lost cause Mark. No hope. 🤷‍♂️ Nicky simply throws me jelly babies and tells me to be quiet. 😩

Anyway … when was the last time you used an onion ? Can you think that far back ? 😳
 

inky finger

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For many seasons now I have fished with a bodied waggler but mostly I fish it as a slider. Its a much overlooked method now although there are a few more anglers giving it a go. The method isn't just for deep waters but good on places that tow hard and you can put some weight down or you have a parrot cage of a swim or even lots of people behind you walking past as in public lakes. I can also make Benwick Sports profits go up by adding to my growing collection of weighted 8grm sliders. Floats anonymous anyone ! Matt Godfrey has done a great video on youtube as has Alan Scothorne. There is a great read as well in the form of Sliding Across Frontiers if you want to learn something more than drop a bit of sweetcorn in at 16mtrs and hang on...lol. How many times on a pleasure session has a an angler spoke to you while fishing the float and said it was there favourite method....then they set up a feeder ? Unless you are near a big tackle shop the float rod range on show will be tiny compared to the feeder rods. I'm not normally this miserable....Its their world now ...lol
 

inky finger

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Thin carbon stems have in my experience been a bit of a pain in longer lengths by sticking to the surface tension and need a bit of line sink on them or a good flick to make them cock consistently. Rive carbon slider and the perfect slider suffer this. I made a carbon stem slider that was very long and it was a pain to get to sit up. Great for lift bites though.
 

nejohn

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Good point I can see on a reservoir with a bit of chop on in a breeze and tow that they could be very good. Not sure I’d want to tackle an open reservoir on a breezy day mind you would feel a bit exposed! This is my sort of reservoir fishing weather bit easier to be in control with no wind 😉

1639579137300.jpeg
PS not sure I want to see any blokes whopper dropper 😅
When I was younger I used to fish Semerwater at the top of Wensleydale quite a lot, it felt like you were fishing the lake on the top of the world, it could be very wild with the wind blowing the rain straight at you and waves on the surface that would not look out of place at sea. It was nearly always a big chuck for bream but there were times and pegs that you could catch on the float with some nice roach alongside the bream, it was thee occasions that the 18inch long bodied wagglers came in useful to both combat the wind and the surface skim. It was nearly always hard work and even in the summer you had to be prepared for inclement weather but it was very rewarding fishing.

 

Deejay8

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I've got a couple of Drennan betalight onions in my tacklebox. Possibly a couple of small ordinary onions as well. They date from the mid 1980s.
 

NoCarpPlease

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Imo, many older but nice looking floats are not as good in use as the modern ones. By that I mean floats like Zerkalos very nice Cleggy float looks nice, and may work ok, but, the modern floats with a carbon stem above the body are more practical.
The thick stems on the older styled floats will/can catch the surface tow more and cause your set up to drag away from your intended spot. The thiin carbon stem on modern floats will cut through the tow more easily causing less darg on itself.
It's a similar scenario/principle to a bolo float when on the river and trotting in fast water. An old school thicker stemmed avon float will flatten out in fast water if held back, but the later bolo style floats with a slim carbon or wire stem hold their position much better.
As has already been mentioned, a long stem is more practicle when fishing in a wind, especially if the stem is thin.
I was going to say jmo, but I have a feeling it is well known.
up to a point I agree ... in theory you could make a bodied waggler with a thin wire stem and a sight bob that would work brilliantly for that - but would probably cast like a drain(pipe). I think I'm saying that balance in flight is also important.

Interestingly, I find it's often necessary to put on a bigger float (ie. more shot down the line) to pick up the flow with an upstream wind (not something you'd suffer from with your 5g bolos :) ).
Although it defies logic - it almost seems like shot pick up flow better than the same surface area of a lighter material!!

I'd suggest that the effect you observe with avon floats is much more to do with the shape of the body and positioning of the top rubber than it is to do with the stem material. For an extreme example refer to the cralusso shark float. In a less extreme example one of the best floats that I've used for "holding back" is an old Image bolo model, where rather than being fixed with a top rubber ... it had a pronounced shoulder and had an eye positioned right on the apex of that shoulder. It also has a long wire stem ... which probably also helps.
 

Silverfisher

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When I was younger I used to fish Semerwater at the top of Wensleydale quite a lot, it felt like you were fishing the lake on the top of the world, it could be very wild with the wind blowing the rain straight at you and waves on the surface that would not look out of place at sea. It was nearly always a big chuck for bream but there were times and pegs that you could catch on the float with some nice roach alongside the bream, it was thee occasions that the 18inch long bodied wagglers came in useful to both combat the wind and the surface skim. It was nearly always hard work and even in the summer you had to be prepared for inclement weather but it was very rewarding fishing.


Wow that does sound pretty extreme. I hate fishing in any wind beyond about 10mph on any water let alone on one of 100 acres! That was boddington in my picture which is 65 acres so can probably get quite nasty in a wind but I’ve only fished it a couple times and deliberately in flat calm conditions. We do have a bit of an inland sea here in the form of farmoor which is something like 400 acres across the two parts parts combined but don’t think they’d be too impressed if you rocked up with a float rod there 😅
 

TiggerXFM

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up to a point I agree ... in theory you could make a bodied waggler with a thin wire stem and a sight bob that would work brilliantly for that - but would probably cast like a drain(pipe). I think I'm saying that balance in flight is also important.

Interestingly, I find it's often necessary to put on a bigger float (ie. more shot down the line) to pick up the flow with an upstream wind (not something you'd suffer from with your 5g bolos :) ).
Although it defies logic - it almost seems like shot pick up flow better than the same surface area of a lighter material!!

I'd suggest that the effect you observe with avon floats is much more to do with the shape of the body and positioning of the top rubber than it is to do with the stem material. For an extreme example refer to the cralusso shark float. In a less extreme example one of the best floats that I've used for "holding back" is an old Image bolo model, where rather than being fixed with a top rubber ... it had a pronounced shoulder and had an eye positioned right on the apex of that shoulder. It also has a long wire stem ... which probably also helps.
No, i'm a 100% sure that a thin carbon stem works much better than a thick stem in any situation, especially in fast water with a chop on. A alloy stem works even better in those conditions 😉.
5g bolos ? I use 3 or 4 gram most of the time 👍.
 
D

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.. well if you run out/need some more; as a fenlander by birth, I am always willing to rate Premier Floats From Cambs. They do boddied wagglers and onions.
Their website:
 

Simon R

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Use bodied wagglers occasionally on larger stillwaters to help combat undertow - I have a variety from 2AAA to 4SSG - the latter being loaded too. I use them as sliders from time to time too - just add a small bead to the line above the float.

One bodied waggler that is sadly missed is the Drennan Polywag - as the name suggests the body was made of some sort of expanded polystyrene, so even a short float would have a large shot-loading. We used them almost exclusively on the Stainy - in the winter months the chub lived tight to the far-bank so a float was needed that would cast the distance (generally around 20m) but wouldn't dive too deep upon impact with the water and potentially spook the fish.
Many of the pegs would have no far bank features just steel sheet piling and on those we'd actually aim to hit the 'tins' which kept the float as tight to them as possible. The Polywags were not particularity robust and it wasn't uncommon to snap the stems off if you clouted the steel piles a bit too hard - having three or four spares was a sensible precaution.
Shame they don't still make them - they'd make good pellet waggler these days.

Simon
 

Zerkalo

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Not cast a bodied waggler in years. I whipped some tiny eyes on to most of mine and converted them into sliders. Much easier to hit bites on a sliding float.

Did you call the smaller version to a bodied waggler a ‘ onion ‘ down your way back in the day Steve ? Not heard the term ‘ onion ‘ to describe a float in years.
Heard the term onion float but never been quite sure what the exact difference is to just a bodied float except for a different shaped body? 🤷‍♂️
 

tipitinmick

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Use bodied wagglers occasionally on larger stillwaters to help combat undertow - I have a variety from 2AAA to 4SSG - the latter being loaded too. I use them as sliders from time to time too - just add a small bead to the line above the float.

One bodied waggler that is sadly missed is the Drennan Polywag - as the name suggests the body was made of some sort of expanded polystyrene, so even a short float would have a large shot-loading. We used them almost exclusively on the Stainy - in the winter months the chub lived tight to the far-bank so a float was needed that would cast the distance (generally around 20m) but wouldn't dive too deep upon impact with the water and potentially spook the fish.
Many of the pegs would have no far bank features just steel sheet piling and on those we'd actually aim to hit the 'tins' which kept the float as tight to them as possible. The Polywags were not particularity robust and it wasn't uncommon to snap the stems off if you clouted the steel piles a bit too hard - having three or four spares was a sensible precaution.
Shame they don't still make them - they'd make good pellet waggler these days.

Simon

The 4SSG bit made me smile. If I were to cast a 4SSG now at distance I don’t think I’d be able to see it. 🤣🤣. Oh the joys of getting older. 😩
 

BoldBear

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Heard the term onion float but never been quite sure what the exact difference is to just a bodied float except for a different shaped body? 🤷‍♂️
No, it’s a slightly loaded bodied waggler like the one in my picture.

It has a slight loading (usually made from copper) in its base and either has an inset tip or is made with a tapered stem often made from tapered peacock quill and is ideal for casting close to lilies etc. and close to the far bank or other distant obstacles while retaining its sensitivity.

Onion.gif

Keith
 
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Total

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I’m a lost cause Mark. No hope. 🤷‍♂️ Nicky simply throws me jelly babies and tells me to be quiet. 😩

Anyway … when was the last time you used an onion ? Can you think that far back ? 😳
Nicky's gonna start catapulting jelly beans at you, better accuracy etc...:giggle:

As for the 'onion' floats: I don't draw decent pegs as good as you Mick...:(
 

Total

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Heard the term onion float but never been quite sure what the exact difference is to just a bodied float except for a different shaped body? 🤷‍♂️
I should also add I've also got some home made jobbies up to 6 swan shot for the "Island hoppers" as described above....(y)
 

tipitinmick

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Nicky's gonna start catapulting jelly beans at you, better accuracy etc...:giggle:

As for the 'onion' floats: I don't draw decent pegs as good as you Mick...:(

You’re still smarting from waxing ya bits aren’t ya ? You’re supposed to tear it off quick. I could hear ya crying from here. 🙄🤣
 

Total

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You’re still smarting from waxing ya bits aren’t ya ? You’re supposed to tear it off quick. I could hear ya crying from here. 🙄🤣
Mrs was getting her own back.....She swapped the adhesive out for Araldite Rapid epoxy!:blahblah::deal::scream::help:
 
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