Bodied Wagglers

Zerkalo

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I mentioned in another thread how satisfying it is to use a bodied waggler. Does anyone feel the same way? It is difficult to put into words why it is satisfying but I think it is because of the additional weight they take, makes casting a doddle, and I like the clunky feeling of striking through them.

I don't have many of them, just a few left over from when I used to fish in the late 90s. And this is the float I used for Tench, casting as far as I can catapult Corn accurately, so not too far out, wouldn't like to put a figure on it.

TenchWaggler.jpg TenchWaggler2.jpg

There's nothing special about this float per se, but having had it for so many years, it was nice to put it to use again, and even more satisfying to catch some decent fish on it. I'm probably going to buy some more bodied wagglers for next year and am looking at Drake floats.

How often do you fish with bodied wagglers? 90% of my waggler fishing is with straight wagglers I'd guess.
 

nejohn

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I use mainly straight wagglers but will use a bodied float when extra distance is required or extra stability in winds or when there is an undertow on the water (some of these are ones I made many years ago and are upto 18 inches long). You will not be disappointed with the Drake floats I have been using them now for a couple of years and found them to be excellent you should also check out the various straight and insert wagglers they do as these are also excellent and they have a pattern for just about every application
 

Zerkalo

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The straight/insert wagglers I use at the moment are Dave Harrells for the river, and Drennan Crystals and Visi Wags for stillwater. But I will look into Drake floats for next year as I feel they should be nice floats based on the Sliders I have from them.
 

Zerkalo

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Blimey @Zerkalo, that float takes me back a few year. I used to make those when I worked for Cleggy. They came in 3, 4, 5, and 6AAA. Nice one. :upthumb:
I've got a few Clegg Collection floats from back when I used to fish in the late 90s, can't remember where I would have got them from but I love using them. I put a date on them of somewhere around the 90s. Decent floats.
 

ukzero1

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I've got a few Clegg Collection floats from back when I used to fish in the late 90s, can't remember where I would have got them from but I love using them. I put a date on them of somewhere around the 90s. Decent floats.
They only had a 2 year run, from 94 to 96.
 

NoCarpPlease

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I only carry two types of bottom end only float with bodies.
  • sliders (so only in the last couple of years as I've restarted fishing this method)
  • trent trotters (which I use for very shallow swims)
both of which I make with balsa body and peacock stem/tip ... and not loaded
 

Silverfisher

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Never really found much call for bodies waggles. They’re just too big, take too much shot and are to noisy for what I do. Only time I’ve seen them used to good effect is when my uncle uses them for tench and bream with worms as they can take a heavy bait and sit still whilst said bait is getting battered by small fish.

For me waggler fishing is simply inserts for silvers and straights for carp.
 

tipitinmick

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Not cast a bodied waggler in years. I whipped some tiny eyes on to most of mine and converted them into sliders. Much easier to hit bites on a sliding float.

Did you call the smaller version to a bodied waggler a ‘ onion ‘ down your way back in the day Steve ? Not heard the term ‘ onion ‘ to describe a float in years.
 

tipitinmick

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Never really found much call for bodies waggles. They’re just too big, take too much shot and are to noisy for what I do. Only time I’ve seen them used to good effect is when my uncle uses them for tench and bream with worms as they can take a heavy bait and sit still whilst said bait is getting battered by small fish.

For me waggler fishing is simply inserts for silvers and straights for carp.

Large reservoirs mate. Lake Garadice in Ireland is where they came into their own. Ground bait catapult and lots of sticky mag.

Ask Ukzero1 to show you his Whopper dropper. 🤣🤣. You may have to wait until the better weather though. 🤣🤣
 

OldTaff

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I have a lovely little stock of Drennan bodied waggler with green bodies and clear stems - love using them on ponds for general fishing plus I have several all clear “puddle chuckers” which are fab and carry a huge amount of weight for their size.

Love the look of those Clegg ones
 

Total

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Not cast a bodied waggler in years. I whipped some tiny eyes on to most of mine and converted them into sliders. Much easier to hit bites on a sliding float.

Did you call the smaller version to a bodied waggler a ‘ onion ‘ down your way back in the day Steve ? Not heard the term ‘ onion ‘ to describe a float in years.
I've heard them called 'onion floats' darn Sarf but the real 'onion ' floats were what we also termed/named as 'Island hoppers'.....Imagine a completely round body/or slight body down float, 1 to 2 long tip and a short stem to accommodate a rubber/swivel float connector. Fished on a waggler rod usually with bread on the hook to nearby island features.

If the wind was favourable you could literally manipulate the float by lifting and dropping the rod tip to 'hop along the island' and follow its coves and contours.....Deadly way to fish....

Of Course Ivan had his onion floats to cast across to the bream on the Welland etc....
 

tipitinmick

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I've heard them called 'onion floats' darn Sarf but the real 'onion ' floats were what we also termed/named as 'Island hoppers'.....Imagine a completely round body/or slight body down float, 1 to 2 long tip and a short stem to accommodate a rubber/swivel float connector. Fished on a waggler rod usually with bread on the hook to nearby island features.

If the wind was favourable you could literally manipulate the float by lifting and dropping the rod tip to 'hop along the island' and follow its coves and contours.....Deadly way to fish....

Of Course Ivan had his onion floats to cast across to the bream on the Welland etc....

Did ya ? We had 16m poles. 🤣🤣
 

BoldBear

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Although Ivan did use onions occasionally the float he and his team used on the Welland to reach the Bream shoals was the Zoomer (not the Onion).

However unlike the Zoomers they later sold in tackle shops the Zoomer floats that Ivan and his team mates used on the Welland were fished 'top and bottom' and not bottom only.

Keith
 

Silverfisher

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Large reservoirs mate. Lake Garadice in Ireland is where they came into their own. Ground bait catapult and lots of sticky mag.

Ask Ukzero1 to show you his Whopper dropper. 🤣🤣. You may have to wait until the better weather though. 🤣🤣
Good point I can see on a reservoir with a bit of chop on in a breeze and tow that they could be very good. Not sure I’d want to tackle an open reservoir on a breezy day mind you would feel a bit exposed! This is my sort of reservoir fishing weather bit easier to be in control with no wind 😉

1639579137300.jpeg
PS not sure I want to see any blokes whopper dropper 😅
 

BoldBear

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Re the Onion waggler=:

In shallowish waters of up to around 6ft max If I need to cast to the edge of some lilies or tight up to bankside vegetation on an island I like using semi-loaded Onion wagglers which fly through the air on the cast as straight as a dye and accurately and without the characteristic waggle that gives the waggler it’s name, and with the hook length flying behind the float on the cast.

The onion is only partially loaded and has 75% of the additional shot still based at the bottom of the float with a couple of no.6 shot at just over half depth and one or two no.8s nearer the hook.

The Onion usually has an inset tip however it also comes with a tapered Peacock quill.

Onion.gif

Keith
 

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TiggerXFM

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Imo, many older but nice looking floats are not as good in use as the modern ones. By that I mean floats like Zerkalos very nice Cleggy float looks nice, and may work ok, but, the modern floats with a carbon stem above the body are more practical.
The thick stems on the older styled floats will/can catch the surface tow more and cause your set up to drag away from your intended spot. The thiin carbon stem on modern floats will cut through the tow more easily causing less darg on itself.
It's a similar scenario/principle to a bolo float when on the river and trotting in fast water. An old school thicker stemmed avon float will flatten out in fast water if held back, but the later bolo style floats with a slim carbon or wire stem hold their position much better.
As has already been mentioned, a long stem is more practicle when fishing in a wind, especially if the stem is thin.
I was going to say jmo, but I have a feeling it is well known.
 
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