Best size rod for feeder fishing??

NathanWatson

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What you need is a rod with thicker tips and a faster taper. 9-10ft is the ideal length for that distance.
 

Cobweb

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If you are keen on staying with Daiwa, why not give the Cast'izm range a quick look for the future? The 11'6 rod (I use the 12'6" version for middle distance chucks) like the others, is powerful, has a terrific through action, and will easily handle anything up to early doubles and chuck a method feeder at least 60 meters
 

NathanWatson

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If you are keen on staying with Daiwa, why not give the Cast'izm range a quick look for the future? The 11'6 rod (I use the 12'6" version for middle distance chucks) like the others, is powerful, has a terrific through action, and will easily handle anything up to early doubles and chuck a method feeder at least 60 meters
Far too long for the 20m he says he’s chucking!
 

Cobweb

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Try reading the post again and my earlier one(s) in response to the OP.
 

Silverfisher

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I do think generally with rods you are better to err on the longer side rather than the shorter side given that a longer rod can do more of what a shorter rod can do than vice versa.

That said 10 and 11 foot feeder rods and 13 and 14 foot float rods (proper float rods that is not the carpy versions) are the best sellers for a reason in that they are the most versatile lengths. Longer and particularly shorter rods are more specialised tools so unless you are in a position to buy rods to cover all eventualities then initially buying the more standard lengths is the sensible option to give yourself the most versatile rods.
 

Cobweb

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I do think generally with rods you are better to err on the longer side rather than the shorter side given that a longer rod can do more of what a shorter rod can do than vice versa.

That said 10 and 11 foot feeder rods and 13 and 14 foot float rods (proper float rods that is not the carpy versions) are the best sellers for a reason in that they are the most versatile lengths. Longer and particularly shorter rods are more specialised tools so unless you are in a position to buy rods to cover all eventualities then initially buying the more standard lengths is the sensible option to give yourself the most versatile rods.
I've always felt that 9 foot rods are for only really tight swims with snags, and , as you say, are limited in their usage. I can see how they might be of a slight advantage over 10ft rods in a match where a lot of f1s and match sized carp are being caught,(close in netting) but on a personal note, I would tend to carry them around as a fall back. Brownings currently have listed in their 2020 catalogue, the Jens Koschnik WC feeder a 2 piece rod, which is sold in two lengths 11 and 12 foot. BRowning's claim that the rod is very versatile and can handle method feeders having a c/w of 50g and the angler can cast up to 50 meters with it. I've only seen that used for roach and skimmers. It sells for around the £120 mark, which is slightly more than their Hyperdrome feeder rod (same length) which I watched Bob Nudd demo bringing in double figure carp fishing at 10-20 meters (mind you the carp did look as though they'd been on chill pill pellets)

I'm looking to buy that Hyperdome as an eventual replacement for my 10ft Speedmaster at some point, as I think it can handle bigger fish, but I'm in no rush
 

Markywhizz

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I’ve got five 9ft feeder rods and love them all. My favourites are the Grbolinos, particularly the Altima. Don’t have any Daiwas though people love them. A 9ft rod is ideal up to 30m. The biggest benefit is that fish come up really close in under the rod tip which makes netting really easy.
 

nejohn

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I’ve got five 9ft feeder rods and love them all. My favourites are the Grbolinos, particularly the Altima. Don’t have any Daiwas though people love them. A 9ft rod is ideal up to 30m. The biggest benefit is that fish come up really close in under the rod tip which makes netting really easy.
I am the opposite with short rods and find the fish comming up close in not great as there are to many obstructions close in like keepnets, fishing platform legs etc for the fish to make a dart for, I much prefer to play them in open water and bring them to the surface further out when they are ready then it should be a just a case of guiding the said played out fish over the waiting net. Seen too many people stabbing at fish with a landing net that is thrashing about on the surface under their feet with the result being either lost fish or worse injured fish. It seems to be a trend on commies near me to get the fish in the landing net as quickly as humanly possible
 

fishcatcher4

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I am the opposite with short rods and find the fish comming up close in not great as there are to many obstructions close in like keepnets, fishing platform legs etc for the fish to make a dart for, I much prefer to play them in open water and bring them to the surface further out when they are ready then it should be a just a case of guiding the said played out fish over the waiting net. Seen too many people stabbing at fish with a landing net that is thrashing about on the surface under their feet with the result being either lost fish or worse injured fish. It seems to be a trend on commies near me to get the fish in the landing net as quickly as humanly possible


I thought it was only me that found short rods and the fish coming up too close a negative.(y)
 

Markywhizz

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I am the opposite with short rods and find the fish comming up close in not great as there are to many obstructions close in like keepnets, fishing platform legs etc for the fish to make a dart for, I much prefer to play them in open water and bring them to the surface further out when they are ready then it should be a just a case of guiding the said played out fish over the waiting net. Seen too many people stabbing at fish with a landing net that is thrashing about on the surface under their feet with the result being either lost fish or worse injured fish. It seems to be a trend on commies near me to get the fish in the landing net as quickly as humanly possible
I am disabled and don‘t have much strength in my arms so I struggle with a long landing net handle. Just because you play fish close in doesn’t mean you need to rush things. I only land fish when they are ready. If you play them at distance for long enough it doesn‘t really matter where you net them (y)
 

Cobweb

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I am disabled and don‘t have much strength in my arms so I struggle with a long landing net handle. Just because you play fish close in doesn’t mean you need to rush things. I only land fish when they are ready. If you play them at distance for long enough it doesn‘t really matter where you net them (y)
I'm also disabled but do have upper body strength. Having said that I think it worth mentioning that I have two landing net poles - a 4.4mtr one for Bream and non carp catches as they come to the surface a lot quicker and I want to avoid bumping, and a 3mtr adjustable twist lock specialist one for bigger fish like carp that often do not feel happy about surfacing. I agree don't try landing too early
 
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