Best Plummet

Danmancity

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Mar 12, 2014
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You would think it's the single most simple piece of tackle, but why is it so hard to find the perfect plummet!

Guru In Line - Easy to put on, great large flat base, completely impossible to remove without pliers for my fingers!
NuFish Cyclops - Great design with the size of the eye for banded hooks, nice flat base but the floppy eye makes it hang awkwardly
Preston - Small-ish eye but just about ok, easy to put on and remove but not wide enough in the base so has a tendency to topple over, also the only plummet I ever remember losing possibly because its quite thin foam on the base
Dinsmore cork base - Tiny eye and too tall with a narrow base

What has been the best option for you? Guru comes closest but its a pain still
Considering buying some of Mark Charnell's flat "nipple" plummets that Jamie Hughes recommended
 

Paul Cresswell

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I use the guru, excellent, I don’t understand your issue, you don’t need to put the hook deep in the plastic bit in the middle.
 

qtaran111

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Sometimes I think threads like these are fantastic for tackle manufacturers. Until today I’ve never even questioned the plummet I use (no idea what make mine is). Now I’m sat on the sofa googling Guru plummets thinking yeah they do look good :LOL:
 

Pompous git

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P1010904.JPG
 

Pompous git

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This is the PG style plummet, simply made from a small bomb and some silicon tube. I make slightly smaller versions using
yellow silicon and when the end of the silicon tube gets dog eared just snip it back, it is the best type of plummet you will
ever use.
 

Dave

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I use one of two bog-standard cork and lead plummets - an ounce one for deep water, a half-ounce one for shallow water

If using a pole, lower the plummet in and you can feel the suck of the silt as you lift it from the bottom. If you want to double-check your depth, use the lighter plummet to slow down the sink into the silt.

Short of use a large disc on your plummet no difference in diameter between the plummets on sale will make any difference to the results. It's all kidology
 

Silverfisher

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Big split shot on a bait band if any sort of proper cast required or if silty bottomed provided the flow isn’t too quick. If not just happy with any cork bottomed one really.
 
Last edited:

robert d

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You would think it's the single most simple piece of tackle, but why is it so hard to find the perfect plummet!

Guru In Line - Easy to put on, great large flat base, completely impossible to remove without pliers for my fingers!
NuFish Cyclops - Great design with the size of the eye for banded hooks, nice flat base but the floppy eye makes it hang awkwardly
Preston - Small-ish eye but just about ok, easy to put on and remove but not wide enough in the base so has a tendency to topple over, also the only plummet I ever remember losing possibly because its quite thin foam on the base
Dinsmore cork base - Tiny eye and too tall with a narrow base

What has been the best option for you? Guru comes closest but its a pain still
Considering buying some of Mark Charnell's flat "nipple" plummets that Jamie Hughes recommended
Guru or preston ,whichever i pick up first
 

Dave

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Here's a bit of information for you - the bottom of ponds and lakes aren't level and aren't flat as glass ;)

If you get really anal over plumbing the depth, to within millimetre perfect, move the rig a couple of centimetres either side and you'll find it varies ;)
Even more so once you remove the plummet and put on a light bait weight such as a pellet, maggot, etc. Often what you think is dead-depth isn't and that's the trick to fine-tuning your rig, assuming the fish are feeding at dead-depth that is.
Use a plummet to get a rough idea of the depth for your rig, then use experience to fine-tune it ;)
 
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