Basic river fishing tackle requirements

MartinWY

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For a lightweight roving setup, would anyone here use a fishing vest? Thinking if I'm carrying landing net handle and rod, a bag would be an unwelcome hindrance. I have a backpack, but stuff wouldn't be as accessible I guess.
 

Silverfisher

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For a lightweight roving setup, would anyone here use a fishing vest? Thinking if I'm carrying landing net handle and rod, a bag would be an unwelcome hindrance. I have a backpack, but stuff wouldn't be as accessible I guess.
It’s an absolute myth that river fishing is always an inconvenience gear wise. It might be different up there but most rivers down here involve either fairly short or at least easy walks to comfortable swims so I don’t take any less gear than I do a commercial in fact often more. A backpack with all your end tackle, bait, reels and food and drink then rods, nets, bank sticks etc in some form of hold-all/quiver in one hand and chair in the other hand. Tbh I often do away with the rod bag and put tubed rods, the net and bank sticks tucked into my folder chair so I have a hand free to do gates etc. That said almost everywhere I fish is trolley friendly as well I just don’t take enough gear to warrant a trolley.
 

MartinWY

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It’s an absolute myth that river fishing is always an inconvenience gear wise. It might be different up there but most rivers down here involve either fairly short or at least easy walks to comfortable swims so I don’t take any less gear than I do a commercial in fact often more. A backpack with all your end tackle, bait, reels and food and drink then rods, nets, bank sticks etc in some form of hold-all/quiver in one hand and chair in the other hand. Tbh I often do away with the rod bag and put tubed rods, the net and bank sticks tucked into my folder chair so I have a hand free to do gates etc. That said almost everywhere I fish is trolley friendly as well I just don’t take enough gear to warrant a trolley.
I was thinking about roving, rather than being stationary. I do have a backpack, but its huge and when full its kinda heavy to be lugging around. Same with holdall, its one of the padded jobbies and gets pretty heavy when loaded.
 

Silverfisher

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I was thinking about roving, rather than being stationary. I do have a backpack, but its huge and when full its kinda heavy to be lugging around. Same with holdall, its one of the padded jobbies and gets pretty heavy when loaded.
Ah I see 👍🏻

Given I mostly fish the middle Thames which is fairly sizeable I go with a static approach so you can build a swim and fish multiple lines etc as it responds better that way than moving about. I do like the odd session roving the Itchen though when down on the coast, you do have to keep moving there as you fish a swim out in a couple hours tops. I do occasionally rove the Thames on my boat but I never catch anything like as well as I do from sitting it out from one spot on the bank.
 

MartinWY

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Ah I see 👍🏻

Given I mostly fish the middle Thames which is fairly sizeable I go with a static approach so you can build a swim and fish multiple lines etc as it responds better that way than moving about. I do like the odd session roving the Itchen though when down on the coast, you do have to keep moving there as you fish a swim out in a couple hours tops. I do occasionally rove the Thames on my boat but I never catch anything like as well as I do from sitting it out from one spot on the bank.
Am I correct in thinking that a super broad river almost behaves like a still water in calm conditions? I'm thinking of sections of the Ouse I've seen near me.

I never did get another boat. Man o man I do miss having one, fishing or not.
 

Silverfisher

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Am I correct in thinking that a super broad river almost behaves like a still water in calm conditions? I'm thinking of sections of the Ouse I've seen near me.
The lowland ones can become almost stillwater like in the summer with them flowing not much quicker than the drift or tow on a stillwater, just more consistently and in the same direction rather than all over the place! I’ve said before that we don’t often long trot on the Thames but short trot instead as it usually flows slow enough that your float doesn’t go that far before you get a bite.
 

Zerkalo

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I think it's a good way to spend some time during closed season to go and have a walk along places you're considering, depending on your situation, you can check out parking, how far you'll need to walk, what the pegs are like etc. I was in a similar situation after moving house a few years ago, went to have a look at the Severn and could spot the hole in my wallet immediately, though you don't really need much tackle, I had some good days early on just going with what I had and making do.
 

Robwooly

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For a lightweight roving setup, would anyone here use a fishing vest? Thinking if I'm carrying landing net handle and rod, a bag would be an unwelcome hindrance. I have a backpack, but stuff wouldn't be as accessible I guess.
I use a fishing waistcoat, which has most my gear in and also have a bait apron but still find I need to take a rucksack/bag too, you still need to carry water,food and spare bait after all
 

NoCarpPlease

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If I’m just going for a short evening session (2-3 hours) floatfishing I’ll just take a
rod, reel, landing net & handle
catapult (although most swims I can feed by hand)
a small box with a hooktier, disgorger, hooks, 2 spools of hook length line, a few shot and couple of spare floats.
half pint of casters (or alternative choice)
Bait apron

no need for any more than that, especially if your target is to catch anything that swims.

fwiw I shortened an old 13ft rod down to 11ft 2in last year and i catch plenty of fish on it ... even on a big river you can catch close in and you will only suffer a bit at longer distances.

Enjoy river fishing!
 

Madd

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Your pellet waggler rod will probablybeon the heavy side for general river work if you are fishing for small roaches ,perch and.probably skimmers you need a lighter action rod, oldscghool match rod, something.like a drennan utralight otherwise you will be ripping the hook out on the strike or snapping the hooklegth
 
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