Banned Breeds

Wolf fish

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Many years ago I did man work with one of my dogs, a border collie, all dogs on the course were assessed for temperament the happy go lucky clowns made the best ones to train. The aggressive ones rejected because they could be a liability due to not knowing when to switch off.

In the early days this could be the problem with many Rotties who once hyped would not switch off but careful breeding for temperament over the years improved the breed no end.

Just to finish I still love Dobermanns and they are my favoured breed but not owned one for many a year due to my personal dislike of what happened to the law change, but that’s for another debate so I’ll leave it there.
 

Zerkalo

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Talking of large dogs, my dads workmate had a Newfoundland, huge dog with webbed feet, that's a breed I'd consider in the right situation.
 

Zerkalo

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Old English Sheep dog, another fairly big dog my aunt had as a kid. Staffies aren't exactly big dogs but they're hard as nails. My brother found one in a cardboard box under a park bench when he was at university, only a puppy, they took it in as their dog and one of his housemates still has it, turned out to be quite a nice dog.
 

Dave

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The one thing that narks me is when little dogs snap and snarl, try to bite other dogs and people and their owners excuse it.
If it was a bigger dog it would cause an outcry and be deemed dangerous yet the issue is the same, its just the degree of damage thats caused.

We had a small dog on a beach earlier this year that ran 30yards or so straight at Winston who was on his lead. It tried everything it could to bite him and the owner did little until I gave Winston some slack and he slapped the thing down.

The owner came over an apologised saying his dog doesnt like big dogs. He was put straight regarding my feelings about his dog and his attitude. Friggin idiots some people.

Another time a Rhodesian Ridgeback ran across the beach and had a go at him.
The owners didnt seem to care even when Winston pinned it down straddling it; he was off the lead at the time.
 

satinet

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I never believe these stories from the MSN, odds on that picture isn't even the dog in question!
They ALWAYS love to use pictures of bully type dog even if the dog in question is a jack russel !

Also, you never know what has happened to the dog to cause it to freak out. People, kids, can do some very nasty things to animals and everything has a breaking point.
Problem is (for the dog, or animal) you will only ever get one side of the story.
Yeah I'm sure the punishment fitted the crime for that 10 year old lad.
 

TiggerXFM

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Many years ago I did man work with one of my dogs, a border collie, all dogs on the course were assessed for temperament the happy go lucky clowns made the best ones to train. The aggressive ones rejected because they could be a liability due to not knowing when to switch off.

In the early days this could be the problem with many Rotties who once hyped would not switch off but careful breeding for temperament over the years improved the breed no end.

Just to finish I still love Dobermanns and they are my favoured breed but not owned one for many a year due to my personal dislike of what happened to the law change, but that’s for another debate so I’ll leave it there.
A close friend of mine used to supply dogs to the police, customs etc. The police only wanted dogs with prey drive "aggression", playful ones were of no use to them. If the dogs didn't show prey deive then they were got rid of. The aggressive ones were trained no problem! Also, an attack dog, when trained properly will leave it's target on command, so, not knowing when to switch off is nonsense.

One of my uncles had a sheep farm and all his "genuine" working border collies were nowty as hell. Ok, they rounded up his sheep but really they wanted to rip them up. The dogs very often bite the sheep whilst working, and the sheep are that thick they will deserve it.
 

davylad

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Rhodesian Ridgebacks, aren't they the ones that bring lions down? :eek:
I can't see that myself, might be a myth, unless there's 20 of them in a pack.
 

Silver fan 82

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Zerkalo, a small breed like a Parson Jack Russell are great but nearly all the ones I have known had a strange trait. They would welcome a stranger into the house and loved to be stroked but when it came time for the visitor to leave they would guard the door to stop them leaving, a few even jumped and hung on to their wrist when the door handle was held. They did this gently and did not break the skin. Other owners have recalled the same trait.

I say Parsons because I just don’t like those stunted short legged types.
My in laws Jack Russell does exactly this.
 

Dave

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Rhodesian Ridgebacks, aren't they the ones that bring lions down? :eek:
I can't see that myself, might be a myth, unless there's 20 of them in a pack.
Originally yes, a hunting dog however they've been bred many times and that instinct is now diluted.
 

Silver fan 82

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When I heard this story on the radio the thing that got me was the reporter saying that the dog in question was a large dog although the breed wasn't known at the time. Straight away you can tell where that is heading. But surely the breed of the dog at that point should be irrelevant? Does it matter if its a pitbull or a chihuahua?
 

Alantherose

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Be afraid. Be very afraid.

IMG_6830.jpeg
 

Wolf fish

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A close friend of mine used to supply dogs to the police, customs etc. The police only wanted dogs with prey drive "aggression", playful ones were of no use to them. If the dogs didn't show prey deive then they were got rid of. The aggressive ones were trained no problem! Also, an attack dog, when trained properly will leave it's target on command, so, not knowing when to switch off is nonsense.

One of my uncles had a sheep farm and all his "genuine" working border collies were nowty as hell. Ok, they rounded up his sheep but really they wanted to rip them up. The dogs very often bite the sheep whilst working, and the sheep are that thick they will deserve it.
I agree with prey drive it's all important in service and trials dogs, however, play is now how the police and trials handlers train their dogs. The aggression still needs to be switched off, unfortunately some dogs, even with the best handlers, do not switch off.

Prey drive is now why the Police are now using Malinois Belgium Shepherds more because they have a stronger prey drive than the GSD .

Yes my dog was also trained to recall on command from a criminal but that to was controversial. A very well respected Police handler once said to me he did not agree with that command and used the comparison of that if you point a gun at someone and then fire it you cannot recall the bullet. In other words do not release your dog unless you are certain it's required. Anything that could put a doubt in the dogs mind when released should not be encouraged.

My collie was worked, not with sheep, but for search, tracking and also man work. They are brilliant working dogs not just with sheep and yes they can be over the top but luckily they have prey drive that in the right hands can be channelled along with their inbred submissive trait.
 
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