Back Leads

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Dave

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Hi Everyone,

Just posted this in a thread on Tackle Talk:

"I often wonder if the use of back-leads could impair on bite indication because not only do they put a right-angle into the rod to bait line but they also can force the line to lay over undulations on the bottom."


and thought I would bring it over into here


Dave
 

Ziptrev

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Dave,
I answered it over there lol,
Tell me please, why cant you tighten the back lead up to the front lead and restore the angle, although I agree you still would have the undulation possibility.

Or am I reading this method totally wrongly? (Uncertainty is why I have not used mine!)
Chees

rev

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Shouldn't happen to a DOG!
 

Dave

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Trev there are two main types of Back-Lead - the Captive and the Flying.

The Flying: These back leads are specially designed to sit on top of silt and pin down between the anglers fishing position and the rig. Essential wherever carp are known or suspected to be wary of tight lines. A large free flow attachment ring minimises line friction and allows the angler to tighten up to the rig for sensitive bite indication. The lead is attached to your main line on the rod side of the rig and when cast out it kind of stays in mid air as the rest of the rig flies out.
The result is you have your rig and main weight out there, the back-lead in the middle and the rods on the bank.

The Captive: This is fastened by a length of cord to a bankstick and is clipped onto the main line after the rig has been cast out. The idea is to hold the line to the bottom from the rod. The lead has a clip that opens when striking so that the line can come free.

It was the second lead that I was wondering about


Dave
 

Ziptrev

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Got ya!

Yes mine are the first type, Kind of Pawn shaped , flat bottom large ring on top.

Didnt appreciate the Captive and now see the angle you mention, dependant on the depth of water in front of the rod tip!

OK , but hardly a right angle , unless really deep close in.
My mental difficulty with the flying is casting with any length of line between lead and rig and if there isnt much, it defeats the whole object!

I was prepared to experiment and then read about MULTIPLE back leads , gave up in despair and have been too busy since!
How do you percieve the multiples?

Trev

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Dave

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The multiples work on much the same principle as the flying. You can use them of the same weight but it can be easier to use them of varying weights, the lightest on the rod side and so on.

Again with all the weight's rings resting against the main rig's lead, you cast out. The weight of the main lead on the rig (usually 50-75grm) pulls the line from the reel and through the other lead's rings. But the other leads also have momentum through the cast but not as much as the main lead due to the weight differences. I don't know if it's something to do with that Newton chappie
.

What you end up with is the main lead in the target area and the other back-leads falling short, spread down the line effectively keeping the main pinned down over the distance.

Don't ask me for a demo
lol,

Dave
 

esox.20

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A slight variation to the captive lead is a lead with a quick release thats clipped on after the cast. The rod then held high on a tight line and the lead allowed to slide down.
The use of a back lead is an attempt to pin the line down to prevent line bites or to prevent carp seeing a tight line near to the bait.
To be honest I messed about with back leads years ago using the above method. I eventually gave it up as I didnt like how the back lead slid down on to the main lead (Bomb type) and held it to the line. An inline lead obviously solves this problem. A back lead also puts another angle into the line which means basicly slack line has to be picked up on the strike. To me having all that line lying on the bottom doesn't fill me with much confidence either.

chill out go fishing
 

Stu

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All Reet,
Using a back lead i find stops line bites, and stops tangles if fishing 2/3/4 rods when a fish is close to the bank. I use captive back leads and the length of the cord holding the back lead can be varied so not just at 90 degrees,i have found that when a fish takes i don't have to strike just lift the rod and the weight of my bomb ensures the fish hooks itself.... well thats the theory of it anyway.

Stu
 

Ziptrev

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Stu, Dave,
If you are using them at Orchid, I'll take a look
Thanks

Trev

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Shouldn't happen to a DOG!
 
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