Avon rods

Twiddler

Regular member
Joined
Mar 19, 2020
Messages
104
Please excuse my ignorance, but what does the word “Avon” mean when choosing a rod, I see them under course fishing rods but also see “Stepped up Avon”, I have a John Wilson Avon rod with 3 quiver tips, do I take it the Avon bit is the normal last section. And lastly why is there not a test curve figure along with the term Avon.

Thanks for looking and don’t be too harsh.
 

Silverfisher

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 10, 2019
Messages
11,002
Yep the Avon section is the normal bit and on the Wilson it’s 1.25tc. The term itself doesn’t really mean anything tbh, well other than river, but not really anything more than that.
 

Truly

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Dec 26, 2020
Messages
162
Please excuse my ignorance, but what does the word “Avon” mean when choosing a rod, I see them under course fishing rods but also see “Stepped up Avon”, I have a John Wilson Avon rod with 3 quiver tips, do I take it the Avon bit is the normal last section. And lastly why is there not a test curve figure along with the term Avon.

Thanks for looking and don’t be too harsh.
I'm very pleased that you asked this question, as I have been wondering what it means too. (y)
 

Twiddler

Regular member
Joined
Mar 19, 2020
Messages
104
Of all the J.Wilson rods which is the better one to choose as an ali rounder,
(ie) float for Crucians and Roach and quiver for Carp and Tench.
 

Silverfisher

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 10, 2019
Messages
11,002
I believe he’s done 4 rods (well 6 if you include the travel versions) which generally in order of best to worst in terms of the regard in which they are held (I’ve only used 2 myself) the Avon quiver comes out top followed by the barbel rod then the baitcaster then the float rod.

If I wanted a rod to float fish for roach and crucians and quiver tip for carp and tench I’d be buying 2 other rods as none of them will do both well.
 
Last edited:

RedhillPhil

Computers verified, riots quelled, wars started.
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 6, 2011
Messages
7,787
This question has been asked before. An "Avon" rod is the name given to a rod made in the style and action of a rod originally to fish on the eponymous Hampshire river. Generally eleven feet long. It will have a through action - i.e. bends all the way to the handle - and have a test curve of a pound and a quarter. It's probably the most useful rod in your armoury being happy float fishing with 3lb line through to legering (I believe that nowadays it's called "fishing the bomb") with 6lb line.
It was designed for the Hampshire Avon so it will happily handle anything from small Roach and Gudgeon to big Chub and medium sized Barbel. I wouldn't specifically fish for big Barbel with an Avon though. I've landed both an eighteen pound Carp and a six pound Tench on mine which is a John Wilson travel Avon which fits nicely into a large holiday suitcase.
 

trotter2

Regular member
Joined
Feb 17, 2011
Messages
2,766
Best one for me is the new version by rovex. The very early ones are more full flex. The rovex are great rods very useful for a lot of application's.
 

richox12

Regular member
Joined
Dec 28, 2003
Messages
2,499
Exactly as RedhillPhil has said. Old, traditional name for a rod used/designed for the Hamphire Avon with characteristics as described.

Stick Float rod will bring up the same question in a few years time !
 

Griffo

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 16, 2020
Messages
164
I remember being inspired by Mr Wilson into buying a Avon rods, when I did a lot of chub and barbel fishing, my take on an Avon rod is that its got a bit backbone usually about 1Ib to 1.5Ib test curve with a lovely through action rather than tippy. JW also promoted rods made by Ryobi at the time. I still have a Ryobi Connoisseur avon rod tucked away somewhere, lovely action to it but the eyes and whipping were shoddy and have been replaced. I must say to this day regardless of my type of fishing I much prefer a through action rod to a tippy rod, something about seeing a rod bend all the way from the butt section (obviously no good for a Gudgeon).
 

TrickyD

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Messages
4,283
It was designed for the Hampshire Avon
But was it ? I asked the question about which Avon an Avon rod was named after,as I'd seen a rod called "The Warwickshire Avon", but after a bit of discussion, the best answer I heard was that Avon was an old English word for river (Afon in Welsh), and as such, an Avon rod is a river rod.
 

Sam Vimes

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 27, 2009
Messages
6,013
But was it ? I asked the question about which Avon an Avon rod was named after,as I'd seen a rod called "The Warwickshire Avon", but after a bit of discussion, the best answer I heard was that Avon was an old English word for river (Afon in Welsh), and as such, an Avon rod is a river rod.
Afon/Avon is undoubtedly a very old word for river, hence the number of different Afon/Avon rivers scattered through the British Isles. However, that doesn't mean that an Avon rod can't have originated in Hampshire and its version of the Avon. Whilst there's nothing absolutely definitive to back that, there are plenty of older texts that suggest that Avon rods originated out of the Hampshire Avon region.
 

Rick123

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 11, 2018
Messages
1,615
This question has been asked before. An "Avon" rod is the name given to a rod made in the style and action of a rod originally to fish on the eponymous Hampshire river. Generally eleven feet long. It will have a through action - i.e. bends all the way to the handle - and have a test curve of a pound and a quarter. It's probably the most useful rod in your armoury being happy float fishing with 3lb line through to legering (I believe that nowadays it's called "fishing the bomb") with 6lb line.
It was designed for the Hampshire Avon so it will happily handle anything from small Roach and Gudgeon to big Chub and medium sized Barbel. I wouldn't specifically fish for big Barbel with an Avon though. I've landed both an eighteen pound Carp and a six pound Tench on mine which is a John Wilson travel Avon which fits nicely into a large holiday suitcase.
Spot on not invented by John Wilson, more in the day of Walker. its a style of rod as suggested above. Normally 10' with a through action 4lb to 10lb line. An ideal all round rod for float fishing ledgering even spinning light lures. However rods have become more species specific these days. I'd still like to find a good one however, just for the nostalgia using it.
 

Sad Teacher

Regular member
Joined
Jan 27, 2019
Messages
164
I have just got a David Lumb hand built one on a 1 1/4lb Chimera Harrison Blank.
Beautiful rod, casts straight not a poker at all.
Also considered the Korum all rounder but at the time it would have been easier to fly to the moon than get one this may have changed now tho.

The Blurb about the rod
CS11-AS 11ft/1lb 4oz: £210.00
Eight rings plus tip - 20mm butt/6mm tip.
What a lovely light through action rod this is. The softness makes it ideal for small specimen species like roach and perch on light lines. Yet the rod will cope with larger, harder fighting, fish should they come along by accident. Everyone who has handled this rod wants one!


 

Reuben

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jan 22, 2019
Messages
3,445
I have just got a David Lumb hand built one on a 1 1/4lb Chimera Harrison Blank.
Beautiful rod, casts straight not a poker at all.
Also considered the Korum all rounder but at the time it would have been easier to fly to the moon than get one this may have changed now tho.

The Blurb about the rod
CS11-AS 11ft/1lb 4oz: £210.00
Eight rings plus tip - 20mm butt/6mm tip.
What a lovely light through action rod this is. The softness makes it ideal for small specimen species like roach and perch on light lines. Yet the rod will cope with larger, harder fighting, fish should they come along by accident. Everyone who has handled this rod wants one!

I had one made by Mark Tunley on Harrison blank but at 12ft. Lovely rod on the float with a separate section for feeder fishing. I agree that not all Avon’s are like pokers - depends on the blank & the manufacture.
 

squimp

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 28, 2006
Messages
2,126
The light Harrison blanks are legendary if you want to treat yourself.
 

Wyncroft

New member
Joined
Oct 7, 2020
Messages
4
Just to add my two penn'orth, I was always under the impression Avon rods were originally around the 0.75 lb to 1lb mark, and the typical test curve has crept up over time the same as carp test curves have over the last decade or two. My current rods are the Darent Valley 0.75 lb and Fox Avon Quiver 0.75 lb, neither of which bend through to the butt with a good waggle like my Daiwa PowerMesh 1 1/4 lb, despite the test curve. Presumably the difference in action is to cater for the quiver section as well as the 'Avon' top joint on the Fox rod. The Darent Valley is just a bit more progressive than some through actions.
Those that have been acquired and since moved on include Daiwa Euro Specialist Avon at 1 1/4 lb (similar action to the Powermesh but lower spec) and the Harrison 11' Avon Special at 1 lb 6 oz, which was more of a progressive action again with a surprising amount of backbone. Lovely rod but not what I wanted for the stretches of the Stour I fish
 

Sad Teacher

Regular member
Joined
Jan 27, 2019
Messages
164
I think that fashion seems to favour fast actions and 'parabolic' rods are not so popular, I think dead baiting rods are a bit more parabolic so as to not fling the bait off over a long cast. I also have a Darent valley 0.75lb which I like a lot. I managed to catch a 6lb jack on it when perch fishing, all went well till I had to net it...
 
Top