Attention to detail and preparation

robert d

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I wonder how many anglers on the forum are perfectionists in that some anglers, myself included, like everything to be perfect for when you turn up at a match.

Speaking for myself my hook length boxes are generally fully populated, my box is always well prepared and organised, winders and floats all neatly arrayed in order. My bait is all prepared the night before and organised simply to put in the car when I load my gear, with maggots riddled the night before with fresh maize and a sprinkling of garam masala. It's one of those little things I've always done and has held me in good stead.

When I get to my peg my set up is always the same, neat and consistent to maximize efficiency. Top kits are all doubled up and with pole rigs I generally have the same pattern and weigh floats set up in 3 offs of the same breaking strain often with 3 different line diameters, i.e. carp diamond, 0.4g x 3 on 0.17, on 0.19 and on 0.21 giving 9 of the same float to cater for different venues.

Then there's the little essentials what we can't do without, engineering pliers, my Moore and Wright electronic vernier gauge to measure hook length dia's and hood wire gauge diameters, all little quirks but all adding to the equation.

I know some anglers who go to the lengths where they even measure the length of the hair and add silicone to it so the hair hangs directly below, however for me this is an unnecessary step too far however I could be missing a trick but we all have our own quirks.

So what are your quirks, must haves and the little things you do, that for you, you have to do before you fish a match or venture out on the bank.
Im tidyish but not tidy enough looking at a few of your ace setups . I must get more organised 🥰
 

baggy

Mark Saunders
Joined
May 3, 2008
Messages
586
I wonder how many anglers on the forum are perfectionists in that some anglers, myself included, like everything to be perfect for when you turn up at a match.

Speaking for myself my hook length boxes are generally fully populated, my box is always well prepared and organised, winders and floats all neatly arrayed in order. My bait is all prepared the night before and organised simply to put in the car when I load my gear, with maggots riddled the night before with fresh maize and a sprinkling of garam masala. It's one of those little things I've always done and has held me in good stead.

When I get to my peg my set up is always the same, neat and consistent to maximize efficiency. Top kits are all doubled up and with pole rigs I generally have the same pattern and weigh floats set up in 3 offs of the same breaking strain often with 3 different line diameters, i.e. carp diamond, 0.4g x 3 on 0.17, on 0.19 and on 0.21 giving 9 of the same float to cater for different venues.

Then there's the little essentials what we can't do without, engineering pliers, my Moore and Wright electronic vernier gauge to measure hook length dia's and hood wire gauge diameters, all little quirks but all adding to the equation.

I know some anglers who go to the lengths where they even measure the length of the hair and add silicone to it so the hair hangs directly below, however for me this is an unnecessary step too far however I could be missing a trick but we all have our own quirks.

So what are your quirks, must haves and the little things you do, that for you, you have to do before you fish a match or venture out on the bank.
Dave, I’m the same. Multiple rigs ready to go, hooklengths tied, all rods made up. My box must be set up the same way every time.

Also see the thread from last week about my rigs.


8BC79A42-26C4-4458-A4EE-23026B150B98.jpeg
 

Silverfisher

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I’m not particularly tidy just make sure I have what I need and have it all within reach. I do research the living daylights out of venues and what works on them and when though, knowledge is king and all that 👍🏻
 

dave brittain 1

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Dave, I’m the same. Multiple rigs ready to go, hooklengths tied, all rods made up. My box must be set up the same way every time.

Also see the thread from last week about my rigs.


8BC79A42-26C4-4458-A4EE-23026B150B98.jpeg
Mark I could have sworn I had commented on that thread but couldn't find a response so may not have sent it. Because I had sold the majority of my commercial gear due to back problems early last year, lockdown has been spent building it back up, making my own floats, tying hook lengths and rigs up. My box, (new), is now is back how my old box was and my kit is getting there so. To be honest when I looked at what I sold, I made a fortune from duplicate pole rigs, floats etc. I had amassed far more than I would ever need and to be honest, selling a lot of it got rid of a lot of kit I rarely used. 3/4's of the commercial work I do is done with the two floats below, pellet on the deck, pellet shallow and pellet in the margins or across to islands.

I think we do collect far too much kit however as we all know you always have that one match where you have to compromise because you haven't got the right float/rig/hook etc so you go and buy it for next time and never use it :rolleyes:

Looking at the posts I think you and Chefster put in as much possibly even more prep than I do, however my view from a mental viewpoint, is that if your prep is right, providing you get a decent draw, when you get to the peg you know it's just you and the fish and it's game on. Everything is where it should be and you can concentrate on your fishing instead of wondering if you'd have been better off on a heavier line because you know when you think that, you just have to reach for your pole roost and swap to the heavier kit because you set it up for that very reason.

When I used to set up three pellet waggler rods 6ins, 12 ins and 2ft deep, people used to say why 3 rods. It was simple as more and more fish came into the peg, competing for the feed they would come shallower and shallower, however what some people didn't realise was that on some occasions the big fish would sit underneath the smaller fish so sometimes I'd start at 2 ft, switch to 1ft, switch to 6ins and then go back down to 24ins. It was trial and error and it took seconds to swap from one rod to another to capitalise on your peg. Without the right prep, or by only setting up two rods I'd have lost vital minutes which convert to fish and weight.

For me you can never be too prepared for a match however there are still those matches where I do think, I wish I'd set that up but by then it's usually too late :ROFLMAO:
 

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baggy

Mark Saunders
Joined
May 3, 2008
Messages
586
Mark I could have sworn I had commented on that thread but couldn't find a response so may not have sent it. Because I had sold the majority of my commercial gear due to back problems early last year, lockdown has been spent building it back up, making my own floats, tying hook lengths and rigs up. My box, (new), is now is back how my old box was and my kit is getting there so. To be honest when I looked at what I sold, I made a fortune from duplicate pole rigs, floats etc. I had amassed far more than I would ever need and to be honest, selling a lot of it got rid of a lot of kit I rarely used. 3/4's of the commercial work I do is done with the two floats below, pellet on the deck, pellet shallow and pellet in the margins or across to islands.

I think we do collect far too much kit however as we all know you always have that one match where you have to compromise because you haven't got the right float/rig/hook etc so you go and buy it for next time and never use it :rolleyes:

Looking at the posts I think you and Chefster put in as much possibly even more prep than I do, however my view from a mental viewpoint, is that if your prep is right, providing you get a decent draw, when you get to the peg you know it's just you and the fish and it's game on. Everything is where it should be and you can concentrate on your fishing instead of wondering if you'd have been better off on a heavier line because you know when you think that, you just have to reach for your pole roost and swap to the heavier kit because you set it up for that very reason.

When I used to set up three pellet waggler rods 6ins, 12 ins and 2ft deep, people used to say why 3 rods. It was simple as more and more fish came into the peg, competing for the feed they would come shallower and shallower, however what some people didn't realise was that on some occasions the big fish would sit underneath the smaller fish so sometimes I'd start at 2 ft, switch to 1ft, switch to 6ins and then go back down to 24ins. It was trial and error and it took seconds to swap from one rod to another to capitalise on your peg. Without the right prep, or by only setting up two rods I'd have lost vital minutes which convert to fish and weight.

For me you can never be too prepared for a match however there are still those matches where I do think, I wish I'd set that up but by then it's usually too late :ROFLMAO:
Completely agree which why I prep like I do, I know that my kit is right every time. The same goes for bait, everything is done at home to make sure it’s perfect. The more I can concentrate on the fishing side on the bank the better and if I can make a change without setting up something I didn’t think about the easier it is. I hate having to spend 5 minutes putting something right because I didn’t prepare and have it set up already, it is time waste that I could have been putting fish in the net
 

Mike atkinson

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I’m the same, all my gear, is perfect, identical set ups ready, in a ready rod bag, my feeder box, is a work of art, 10gram feeders, upto 75gram, all in separate compartments,, two large side trays, left and right,, groundbait bucket, in a hoop,, back tray on, roller for my landing net handle, the works👍👍👍
 

Chris Calder

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I don't prep before and after every match, if I have 14 floats tied in a tray I will wait till 4 to 6 are left with line on them and then redo the used floats.
Main thing with me is side trays are laid out exactly the same each match, so I can near enough pick something up without looking.
As the years pass by I try to simplify as much as possible, less rig trays, less float patterns and less hook patterns, seems to need less prep work.
One thing I am most fussy about is floats, if a float does not sit properly each time it goes in, taking on water, it gets broken on the bank to make sure I do not retie it.
 

Cobweb

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I have a certificate in reading profit and loss accounts, but that’s as close to a ledger I ever want to get......
I used to prepare them, and balance sheets so when I heard about ledgering I thought "Shute", (or words to that effect) I started this to get away from work!
 
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