At what point am I 'dry' after a burst pipe?

Philocalist

Regular member
Joined
Dec 11, 2004
Messages
2,741
No doubt at all someone on here will have a much better idea than I do?..........
Maybe 6 weeks ago now we became aware of a burst pipe below the downstairs floor. Unfortunately, by the time we had twigged onto what was happening, water levels had risen high enough to be touching the underside of the floor in areas - chipboard type flooring over which was laminate wood flooring. Water had also travelled up walls at that point, mostly obvious around wall sockets above skirting boards etc.
Sods Law also made it happen about 3 weeks after we had just decorated the entire house....... :rolleyes:

On advice of insurance company, laminate came up, floorboards left in place, and humidifiers running ever since, though its mostly overnight, when doors and windows can be kept closed - not much point running the dehumidifiers otherwise.
Floorboards, walls etc now appear substantailly dry - probably........ and any standing water beneth the floor has now drained / dried away.

I say 'probably', because the dehumidifiers are still managing to pull out quite a bit of moisture (from the air in the rooms) every night - typically 2 - 4 litres from the lounge / diner / kitchen in maybe 6 / 7 hours - but I've no idea at all whether this is just normal, and expected (i.e. being pulled from the air at a rate that would be expected), or if its still dealing with the aftermath of the flooding, leeching water out of the plasterwork etc, still - I've no 'baseline' to work from, which would indicate what level of extraction I might expect if the machines were running overnight in 'normal' circumstances.

On the one hand, I want floors down again, and the walls repairing and redecorating asap, but obviously dont want to do this prematurely - what options do I have to check whether its all dry / safe enough to go ahead with repairs?
TIA (y)
 

Dave

Red Leader
Staff member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 8, 2001
Messages
74,705
I did a job a few years ago where a burst pipe (not mine) had flooded the ground floor of a house up to the laminate flooring.
The house was built on screeded concrete and took six months to dry out using two industrial dehumidifiers that were plumbed to drain outside.

The moisture levels were measured until they fell below the permitted level.
 

Philocalist

Regular member
Joined
Dec 11, 2004
Messages
2,741
I did a job a few years ago where a burst pipe (not mine) had flooded the ground floor of a house up to the laminate flooring.
The house was built on screeded concrete and took six months to dry out using two industrial dehumidifiers that were plumbed to drain outside.

The moisture levels were measured until they fell below the permitted level.
Errrm .... how are moisture levels measured (in a way that would make sense to me, a mere mortal :) )
 

Browner

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Dec 29, 2011
Messages
4,048
Use a humidification gauge. Normal household humidity is about 35-55 I believe. Over this the air is potential too moist, below the air is too dry. If you use a good de humidifier to remove the moisture it will tell you what the level is.
 

Dave

Red Leader
Staff member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 8, 2001
Messages
74,705
As above but also taking moisture readings of the slab and walls
 

satinet

Regular member
Joined
Aug 11, 2014
Messages
1,180
You need to buy a device that tests it really.

As Dave says it can take a very long time for dampness to go away and if you start trying to lay floors etc before it's ready you're going to regret it. Decent floor layers are very fussy about what they lay on to for latex etc.
 
Top