Any truth in it?

Dave Spence

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When I was a kid in the sixties, I would listen to my Dad and his mates talking about fishing and their opinions of anglers from other parts of the country. It appeared to be a wide held belief in Nottingham that Sheffield anglers used too much groundbait and North Yorkshire anglers would spoil a venue by getting the fish too pre-occupied with wasp grub. I know now that there were/are some fine anglers from Sheffield and the expertise of the Yorkshire anglers fishing the 'grub' is now legendary. I wonder if people from other parts of the country used to feel the same about Notts anglers fishing bronze maggot? Was it just a case of sour grapes or was there any truth in it?
 

Cobweb

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Sorry can't help, I'm from the softy south where we were taught that fishing was something you did with flies to get some trout, but only young ones as the older ones were often called spinsters
 

The Landlord

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Blimey - wasp grub, there's a blast from the past. I've never used it myself & I don't think I've seen it mentioned once on this forum.
In the 80's, bronze maggot was the new "super bait" here in the North West as well.
 

ukzero1

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Bronze maggot was THE bait on the Trent many years ago when 4 or 5 pints was the norm for a session, and a gallon for matches. I used to use wasp grub myself during my time on the match circuit, not seen it used in years. The grub was a very good bait.
 
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nejohn

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Back in the day wasp grub was a killer bait for the river Tees chub, so I thought I would try it on the Wear...found a wasps nest on the river bank and went armed with all of the kit, blew the smoke into the hole and waited 30 mins, then proceeded to dig, soon I was surrounded by angry wasps and my only option was a running jump into 6 feet of cold river wear...didn't try that again...!!
As for bronze maggot that was the go to bait in the north east for a good few years...the handle of my early microlight still has the colour to prove it
 

Dave Spence

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Bronze maggot was THE bait on the Trent many years ago when 4 or 5 pints was the norm for a session, and a gallon for matches. I used to use wasp grub myself during my time on the match circuit, not seen it used in years. The grub was a very good bait.
How do you prepare grubs mate? I have used them but I just took the cake with me and extracted grubs as I needed them or just used a piece of the cake itself. I have since heard that they need substantial prep in order for them to be effective.
 

ukzero1

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How do you prepare grubs mate? I have used them but I just took the cake with me and extracted grubs as I needed them or just used a piece of the cake itself. I have since heard that they need substantial prep in order for them to be effective.

I did the same as you mate. I have seen others go to the point of removing the grubs and then putting them into flour, maize or other such substance but I never bothered.
 

Dave Spence

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Back in the day wasp grub was a killer bait for the river Tees chub, so I thought I would try it on the Wear...found a wasps nest on the river bank and went armed with all of the kit, blew the smoke into the hole and waited 30 mins, then proceeded to dig, soon I was surrounded by angry wasps and my only option was a running jump into 6 feet of cold river wear...didn't try that again...!!
As for bronze maggot that was the go to bait in the north east for a good few years...the handle of my early microlight still has the colour to prove it
Not an activity I would like to try buddy although, I was tempted once. Back in the late 70's early 80's there was a product advertised called Cymag; according to the blurb all you needed to do was put a couple of spoons of the powder against the entrance to a nest, moisten it and half an hour later all the wasps would be gone. Fortunately for me, before I got the chance to try it, warnings started to appear about the dangers of this stuff. It, apparently, produced Cyanide gas which could be fatal if inhaled; needless to say; my enthusiasm was curtailed and I stuck to the 'safe':p chrysodine dyed bronze maggots.
 

Method Man

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I too am a southern softie, and when we were kids in Norwich all we used were bronze maggot, dug our own lob worms, and if you couldn’t catch on that a bit of bread and cheese from ya sarnie rubbed between ya fingers to make a paste bream and roach loved it on the concrete wharf steps Norwich city centre, Happy Days...?
 

ukzero1

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Another bait that was popular round here was gozzers. Although I very rarely saw them being used much outside Yorkshire, they too were a deadly bait on still waters. Brilliant for Roach and Bream.
 

Dave Spence

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Another bait that was popular round here was gozzers. Although I very rarely saw them being used much outside Yorkshire, they too were a deadly bait on still waters. Brilliant for Roach and Bream.
Bred on a pigeon wing, in the dark, if I remember right. Don't hear much of them nowadays, similar thing with Annattos (excuse if spelt wrong).
 

ukzero1

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I used to breed them on beasts heart from the butchers. Didn't get a lot, but enough for hook baits for a session.
 

James Dunn

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Not an activity I would like to try buddy although, I was tempted once. Back in the late 70's early 80's there was a product advertised called Cymag; according to the blurb all you needed to do was put a couple of spoons of the powder against the entrance to a nest, moisten it and half an hour later all the wasps would be gone. Fortunately for me, before I got the chance to try it, warnings started to appear about the dangers of this stuff. It, apparently, produced Cyanide gas which could be fatal if inhaled; needless to say; my enthusiasm was curtailed and I stuck to the 'safe':p chrysodine dyed bronze maggots.
Back when Cymag was freely available (I used to buy a 7lb tin) I used to get the nest's using it as you say.I would put a small ammount of Cymag in a jar to take with me on the search for the wasp's nests,When a nest hole was found 1 teaspoonfull of Cymag was placed exactly at the entrance hole to the nest,to do this I had adapted a teaspoon & landing net screw thread so that I could have it secure at the end of an extending landing pole and then deliver the Cymag as safely as possible to the target area.I only wet the Cymag when it was getting old and losing it's strength.Always had to make sure you held your breath when getting it out of the jar and were upwind when placing it on the hole.Deadly stuff indeed it was.
 

Brian the Fish

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It seems you were using cyanide to kill the wasps, infect the grubs and then feed these to the fish.
Sounds like your last sentence is quite true "Deadly stuff indeed it was. "
 
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