Any 'idiot guides' available?

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Carol Herbert

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I used to fish with my father until my early teens - and of course he always set up my equipment. I have recently started fishing again, but as my father died some time ago and I don't know any other fishermen I'm floundering a little.
I can tie a hook, and am catching goldfish-sized fish with a simple float and No.14 hook and maggots - but have absolutely no idea what fish they are and what bait/hooks/lines etc to use to catch bigger fish.
I've bought loads of fishing magazines but they are just confusing the situation further as they are all geared to people who already know the basics - like they tell you what bait to put in your swimfeeder they don't actually show you how or where to attach the thing!
My question - does anyone out there know of a true 'beginners' or 'idiots' guide to fishing that could start me off?

Any help would be most appreciated, as the fishermen at my local pond seem to dry up and look embarrassed when asked questions by a mere 'girl'.

Many thanks.
 

Dave

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Hi Carol,

One of the best books that we have come across is 'Freshwater Fishing Tips and Techniques' written by Gene Kugach.
One of the best ways to learn though is by experience and asking but as you have already found out, the latter can sometimes cause a few problems, especially as the fishermen at your local pond seem to dry up and look embarrassed when asked questions by a mere 'girl'.
icon_smile.gif

Lets start with the first bit - swimfeeders

One of the simplest and often most effective ways to use a feeder is attach a 'link swivel'to the feeder, thread your line through the swivel eye and pull it through by about 18 inches. Get yourself some 'leger stops'. These are small tubes with a tapered wedge. Thread your line through the tube and lock it in place by pushing the wedge in from the feeder side of the line.
Once you have done that, tie on the hook and away you go. Size 20 or 18 for a single maggot, 18 or 16 for two maggots, 16 or 14 for three.
Make sure that you put the maggots on the hook first, then when you have filled the feeder, dunk it very briefly intothe water before you cast. This will help keep the feeder full and give a bit of extra weight for casting icon_smile.gif

Hope this helps and feel free to ask some more.
A link to the book is here if you want
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0811727653/gomaggotdrowning&tag=gomaggotdrowning

Regards, Dave


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Edited by - dave on 22 Aug 2001 12:45:01 AM
 

Carol Herbert

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Thanks David

I have a couple of questions about this though - sorry!
The swim feeders I have are quite heavy in themselves as they are weighted. How would this affect the float - wouldn't it pull the float under the water? Is it just a case of using a bigger float, or have I completely lost the plot? Also, do I use the full length of the hook line, or would it be better to shorten it slightly to bring it closer to the feeder?

Sorry to be a pain.
 

Dave

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Hi Carol,

Normally you wouldn't use a float with swimfeeders.
Once youhave cast the feeder out, allow it to sink and then slowly wind your line in so that you remove any slack. A bite is then registered by the tip of the rod moving when a fish has taken the bait.

Special rods are available for this type of fishing but you may well find that the rod you have has a threaded insert in the top ring. If so pop into the local tackle shop and buy yourself a 'quivertip'.
This is just an extension to the rod but is extremely sensitive to any line movement.

Hope this helps.
Shortening the hooklength can come in handy if the fish are really feeding well, likewise lengthening it if they are slow to feed or shy.

Regards, Dave
 

Larry Teepot

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OK so now carol thinks im a pervo and wants to know where she lives
(looking at my message it is a bit abrupt sorry it was never meant to be )the reason i asked where you lived is because there were some beginer classes at moorlands not far from kidderminster i think they were on a Monday thats all I was gonna say honest!!

Larry Teepot
 

Dave

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Now would we think that Larry icon_smile_big.gificon_smile_big.gificon_smile_big.gificon_smile_big.gif

If I was to receive a pound for every time that I had written something then had to go back and change it, I'd be a rich man,, lol


Regards, Dave

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Stu

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Hi Carol,
If you want the Best if bothh Float & swimfeeder fishing,
you can buy a range of floats with Swimfeeders on them called GUZUNDERS.
this is not a joke Honest icon_smile_approve.gif
 

Carol Herbert

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Hi

Just to let you all know my progress.

I tried feeder fishing for the first time 2 sundays ago, with amazing success. I found a nice man in a small tackle shop who showed me how to set up a feeder rig, and gave me tips on bait etc. On my first outing I not only caught the usual goldfish-sized perch and roach, but got two good mirror carp, both about 2.5 - 3 lb each - using sweetcorn, so I was quite chuffed.

Last week I went to a different pond at Barlow, near Chesterfield, and went back on the float. Again, I managed to get a few carp and some good sized roach on sweetcorn and castors. It was also good to find somewhere with not only toilets but a cafe as well.

I must say that the lack of toilet facilities is probably one of the main reasons more women don't fish.

Regards

Carol
 

Dave

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Hi Carol
quote:I must say that the lack of toilet facilities is probably one of the main reasons more women don't fish


To be honest, I'd have never thought of that. I suppose it's not as easy as just finding a tree icon_smile.gif

Maybe fishery owners need to look into the facilities that they provide.

I'm glad to hear that you're now catching, maybe you could share some tips with us icon_smile.gif

Regards, Dave
 
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