Any backwinders?

grey

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My issue with only being able to play off the clutch, is your only option is limited to playing the fish hard.

Clinging on until a fish is sufficiently knackered isn't always the quickest way to land a fish.

With backwind removed, it restricts the ability to give the fish line to help steer it around areas you'd prefer the fish not to be.

Additional line twist and fine control of giving line when unhooking, baiting up or about to cast is a big spoiler for clutch-only reels too.

Times when using the clutch is great, times when it's a hindrance - I like to have the option of 'on' or 'off'
 

bryan white

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Always slightly over loosen the clutch and use my finger to control how much line is released , along with my 507 and centrepin
 

Anglingman

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That’s exactly what I was thinking!

It’s clearly an each to their own thing and maybe it’s just something you can either do or not but I can’t really see how people could find backwinding complicated or manage to get in a mess with it. It gives you a direct link to the fish and you just sort of give when you need to and pull back when you can. I’ve never experienced and jerking or wrapped knuckles it’s all a very smooth and direct process. Only bit that can be a bit fiddly is netting but not particularly so.
and the reality is you could have written exactly the same for using the clutch so it really is just a marmite topic. I was a backwinder but the migration to commericals with (arguably) larger, stronger fish and major technical leaps with reel clutches made the transition easy and could certainly not go back.

Not that i fish many rivers these days but if I do then I do revert to backwinding roach and skimmers with my old ABUS so the process is not lost on me,i'm just a clutch convert now:p
 

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Mr Ginster
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My issue with only being able to play off the clutch, is your only option is limited to playing the fish hard.

Clinging on until a fish is sufficiently knackered isn't always the quickest way to land a fish.

With backwind removed, it restricts the ability to give the fish line to help steer it around areas you'd prefer the fish not to be.

Additional line twist and fine control of giving line when unhooking, baiting up or about to cast is a big spoiler for clutch-only reels too.

Times when using the clutch is great, times when it's a hindrance - I like to have the option of 'on' or 'off'
thats just simply not true, tbh....you can set the clutch as light as you like ( I do) and simply apply extra pressure when necessary. it is not a hit and hold, hard fight method at all. More a very controlled, smooth direct feel and contact process that you totally own.

I understand the line twist argument but simply you don't wind whilst the fish is taking line and then twist is never a problem.
 

alsur

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and the reality is you could have written exactly the same for using the clutch so it really is just a marmite topic. I was a backwinder but the migration to commericals with (arguably) larger, stronger fish and major technical leaps with reel clutches made the transition easy and could certainly not go back.

Not that i fish many rivers these days but if I do then I do revert to backwinding roach and skimmers with my old ABUS so the process is not lost on me,i'm just a clutch convert now:p
That's what is I've done with the exception I now happy to use clutch float fishing on rivers there is no way I would rely on clutch on my Abu506 which I no longer use as it feels like a coffee grinder.

I also agree on line twist I don't wind when fish is taking line and I've never had a problem with line twist.
 

grey

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thats just simply not true, tbh....you can set the clutch as light as you like ( I do) and simply apply extra pressure when necessary. it is not a hit and hold, hard fight method at all. More a very controlled, smooth direct feel and contact process that you totally own.

I understand the line twist argument but simply you don't wind whilst the fish is taking line and then twist is never a problem.
I hear what you're saying, but loosening a clutch right off to give line does promote line-twist.

Every complete revolution a spool through drag will put a single twist in your line. It's the unavoidable physics.

Without going into boring detail, generally whatever distance you're fishing at - that's how much line you can safely give through your clutch before it starts giving you twist problems: e.g. fish at 30yrds, you have 30yrds of clutch control available, seems plenty until you give line freely, then you soon use up your quota. Remember, you inherit the line twist from the previous session too.

Best advice is to use the clutch as little as necessary, which does mean having to playing the fish hard.
 

grey

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That's what is I've done with the exception I now happy to use clutch float fishing on rivers there is no way I would rely on clutch on my Abu506 which I no longer use as it feels like a coffee grinder.

I also agree on line twist I don't wind when fish is taking line and I've never had a problem with line twist.
I don't think the ABU's cause any line twist when using the clutch - because the handle slips rather than the spool (?)

I wouldn't rely on it's clutch system either :ROFLMAO:
 

Steve57

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Genuine question.
What is the difference between the spool being still with the rotor/bail arm turning and the rotor/bail arm being still and the spool turning?
 

grey

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Genuine question.
What is the difference between the spool being still with the rotor/bail arm turning and the rotor/bail arm being still and the spool turning?
It's a very sensible question.

Imagine a loose washing line fixed both ends. You can twist it, turn it wrap it in your hands - but as soon as you let it go, you know it's going to unravel itself and return straight. That is the same principle a bail arm works on.

Now imagine that same washing line with one end fixed, the other tied to a spool - now imagine rotating the spool... you soon get a twisted washing line. That is the same effect as using your clutch produces - one rotation of the spool = one twist in the line.

For the concept of a 'fixed spool' reel to carry on working efficiently, neither end of your line should be allowed to rotate! This includes allowing the float or feeder to twizzle when you lift out of the water.
 
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Don’tTellEmYourName

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Marmite, you either do or you don’t. Just do what feels right for you.

My backwind depends on the decrepit state of the reel I happen to be using at the time.
 

Deejay8

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I'm a backwinder. I grew up with Mitchell and ABU reels, which I loved apart from the rubbish clutches. So I learned to backwind.
 
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