Angling heroes

TrickyD

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Just having a read, loads of famous names from the past, and talking of the 1200 peg matches.
 

RedhillPhil

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Interesting this waggler thing.
When I started "proper grown-up fishing" in about 1961 on the Chesterfield canal everyone attached the float by the bottom ring only. They weren't "wagglers", they were just floats - usually Porcupine quills. They came supplied with a little band to attach them at the top but I don't or can't recall anyone doing that.
Here I am in 2020 and I still just attach the float by the bottom.
I keep hearing and reading of "stick float technique" but I'm never quite sure of the advantage.
I will now sit back and wait to be told.
Ayethangyou!
 

rudd

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You can hold back a float attached top and bottom to make bait flutter upwards, it also stops line sinking - best used in running water.
 

G0zzer2

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The term 'waggler' was first termed by Nottingham angler Johnny Rolfe, who cast a waggler (fixed bottom only) into the Trent when it was running quite fast and, to his surprise, caught fish. It waggled as he retrieved it, hence the name. It then tended to be used as a name for all floats fixed bottom only. From the time that was reported more and more anglers tried it on fast-moving waters, as it allowed them to floatfish at greater distances than they had previously done.

Up to then floats fixed at the bottom only were normally called 'antenna' floats, and used mainly on stillwaters.

Up to then the only floats used on the Trent tended to be fixed top and bottom - ie 'stick' floats. The advantage of fixing a float this way is that when held back the tip remains above the surface - a waggler tends to be pushed forwards and down by the current.
 

tipitinmick

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Jim Baxter used to come and spend time with us when I fished for Barnsley juniors. A really nice guy. He’d gone when I moved up into the blacks. If memory serves me he was a fantastic waggler angler on the river Witham around Kirkstead / pound length.

The best waggler angler I’ve ever seen was Kim Milsome. As smooth as silk on small fish while waggler fishing. I sat behind him mesmerised at Edgbaston for a full five hours.
 

Dave Spence

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Correct me if I am wrong but is the picture Johnny Rolf? Looks like a walkers of trowel jacket he is wearing. John was credited as being the first to seriously fish with a bottom end attached float in the Trent and they were referred to as swingers. The term waggler came along later. You could buy floats with a Johnny Rolf swinger attachment, a long eye that was turned into itself so you didn't have to break down to change your float
 

squimp

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The name tag on his jacket says ‘Johnny Rolfe’ so I guess it must be him ?
 

rd115

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Correct me if I am wrong but is the picture Johnny Rolf? Looks like a walkers of trowel jacket he is wearing. John was credited as being the first to seriously fish with a bottom end attached float in the Trent and they were referred to as swingers. The term waggler came along later. You could buy floats with a Johnny Rolf swinger attachment, a long eye that was turned into itself so you didn't have to break down to change your float

Still there Walkers of Trowell, will be popping in soon to get my deadbaits :D
 

rd115

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There's an old bloke there if that's him? adds everything up with pen and paper :)
 

Flathead

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Is David Bardens still there?
I think Dave Barden was John Walker’s business partner and took over when John died. Shaun Harrison also worked there for years.
It is many years since I have been there but used to be a regular customer
 

Dave Spence

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I think Dave Barden was John Walker’s business partner and took over when John died. Shaun Harrison also worked there for years.
It is many years since I have been there but used to be a regular customer
That's right, i remember Dave taking over, my mate Mick Bailey was head of mail order at the time.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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Interesting this waggler thing.
When I started "proper grown-up fishing" in about 1961 on the Chesterfield canal everyone attached the float by the bottom ring only. They weren't "wagglers", they were just floats - usually Porcupine quills. They came supplied with a little band to attach them at the top but I don't or can't recall anyone doing that.
Here I am in 2020 and I still just attach the float by the bottom.
I keep hearing and reading of "stick float technique" but I'm never quite sure of the advantage.
I will now sit back and wait to be told.
Ayethangyou!

Have a read through @MarkW 's serialised guide to stick float fishing. Search "stick" in titles posted by Mark.
 

Barbel seeker

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Having read the Ivan Marks books he refers to zoomer floats which I took to be a large distance float attached top and bottom , he used these sometimes when bream fishing on the nene and Witham etc is this what was used before the waggler or is it just another method of the times or was it Ivans preference for distance fishing, Ivan was my hero and met him once what a guy he made time for everone
 

NoCarpPlease

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The Welland zoomer is a very specialised float (pretty much for that venue only), a loaded bodied antenna that was fished top & bottom.

The name "zoomer" was also applied to bottom end only loaded floats for distance fishing. In fact - you can see the adoption of the term between Ivan's two books - match fishing and float fishing. In the latter he describes his commercial range of floats and includes both types of zoomer, whereas in the earlier book zoomer is reserved for the top& bottom float for the Welland.

Nice series that on the C&RT website!
Hard to pick a best from that lot ... two world champions and two silver medallists among them
There's also a canal anglers and greatest angler (who started out on canals). I think that area is curated by John Essex - who was a member of the Leicester Likely Lads and has recently had published a history of the national championships.
 

G0zzer2

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The Zoomer was, indeed, an antenna float fixed top and bottom. Ivan invented it originally for fishing the Welland, which for much of its wide length runs South-East to North-West, and often used to have movement. The wide Welland extends for a comparatively short length from Peakirk to Spalding, (perhaps ten miles). Above this the narrow Welland (which used to run across the bottom of my garden in Market Deeping) is flowing most of the time, except in a hot summer, and that runs into the wide Welland at Peakirk, giving it some movement a lot of the time.

Match fishing always took place on the Western bank, which gave anglers an upstream wind in the prevailing West/North-Westerlies. The Zoomer was weighted mainly under the float - enough weight to allow a long cast (up to 40 yards) to pick up the flow, which tended to be on the far side, as that was the easiest side for dredgers to work when they deepened the river. The rod was held high, and the rig fished like a stick float, with the wind holding the line upstream. This picked up any movement in the deep channel.

The cast had to be careful - a high looping cast to avoid tangles, and to allow the rig to land close to the far bank rather than the quick lash which you would normally give a bottom-only waggler float, but which would result in the bait flying ahead of the float.

Conditions had to be near-perfect for the Zoomer to work, of course.
 

160642fishing

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The first waggler I owned was given to me by Robin Grouse after I gave him my casters at Collingham,apparently Dave Rossi had made a balls up of doing their casters,Robin was next peg upstream of me,I was on the start of the sandy bend,I sat and watched him fish the wag at distance,using groundbait to get the casters out,I'd never seen a wag used on the Trent,ironically I beat him on Trent Lock a few weeks later using the same float,he did pack up mind and spent a bit of time with me,lovely bloke.
 

tipitinmick

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Having read the Ivan Marks books he refers to zoomer floats which I took to be a large distance float attached top and bottom , he used these sometimes when bream fishing on the nene and Witham etc is this what was used before the waggler or is it just another method of the times or was it Ivans preference for distance fishing, Ivan was my hero and met him once what a guy he made time for everone
‘ Zoomer ‘ .... that name is a blast from the past. A bit like ‘ onion ‘. This forum some days makes me feel old. ??
 
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