Anglers Needed to Fight the Plastic Tide

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It’s no secret that plastic is suffocating our seas. From tiny microplastics invisible to the naked eye making their way up our food chains to enormous ghost nets engulfing marine life and taking them to their watery grave. Our oceans are in crisis.

If we don’t do something the amount of plastic entering our seas is expected to triple by 2040 and will do irreversible damage to the health of our marine environment, and consequently our fishing.

Some of the biggest plastic offenders are from the fishing industry, and while the commercial fishing sector dominates this, we must not forget that as recreational sea anglers we also have our part to play in fighting the plastic tide.

Our fishing line in particular can do catastrophic damage to marine life by entangling everything from the largest to the smallest species. Everyday plastics, like packaging, can be ingested by marine life too, having devastating consequences for our wildlife.

With both foraging and catching for the table rise in popularity, it’s also in our interests to reduce plastic pollution as bioaccumulation – the process where plastic travels up the food chain – can have harmful impacts on human health.

It’s estimated that at current rates there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish by 2050 – we have to take action, be responsible citizens and reduce our consumption of pesky plastics. As anglers and users of our precious coastline it is partly our responsibility to take care of our seas. The future of sea angling depends upon a healthy marine environment.

So, what now? Anglers Against Pollution is the Angling Trust’s new flagship campaign seeking to hold the Government to account on pollution across our water environments. You can join us today by signing our petition and adding your voice to our fight for a clean environment for our fish.

How Can You Help?


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R0B

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Something that strikes me as ludicrous is the amount of plastic which is still used for packaging in the tackle industry. Completely out-of-touch it seems. As custodians of the waterside environment - shouldn't we be trying to reduce our plastic usage across the board? not just recycling line.

Come on, Drennan, Preston, Korum etc.. I am astonished at the unnecessary plastic cr*p I have to get through for terminal tackle items. Every feeder or pack of beads seem to come surrounded by more than its own weight in packaging plastic.
 

pies

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Qm1 hooks in a plastic box wrapped in plastic wrapper
virtually every seatbox attachment has three different leg adapters rather than just selling the one you need, the rest get binned, or stored never to be used
most tackle is made of plastic, as its a good material to make tackle from, but ive yet to see anything marked as recycleable
Manufactures must take the lead im afraid
 

R0B

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most tackle is made of plastic, as its a good material to make tackle from, but ive yet to see anything marked as recycleable
Absolutely, and I haven't seen anything marked as made from recycled plastic either. Catapult bodies, rod rest heads, anything 3d printed etc are absolutely prime for this. I bought a Drennan quiver rest - a simple piece of moulded plastic for £3.99 - I'd pay double if it was sustainably produced/packaged because I'd have the choice of supporting a company showing environmental concerns.
 

derwentboy

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You cannot deny the amount of plastic packaging used in the industry has reached daft proportions, especially with certain brands but it's not just angling you see this in. It's everywhere and is obviously a whole industry in itself
Is it all to do with easy to see and hang display stands in shops I wonder?
Or is it more to do with ease of transport and storage? Am I right in thinking that 90% of tackle on shelves is China/Far East manufactured?
What did we do before all this? and do we really need that much plastic packaging? I couldn't give a monkey's if it's wrapped in plastic or not
 

Lee Richards

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Rob,mass produced parts using 3d printing is commercially unviable and would use more energy than ejection moulding for the same quantity.

As for paying double then if everything was to be recyclable then no doubt we would as the process to refine and then rework again is more than that of the lower grade "disposable"

The first company to make low cost high volume recyclable plastics that can be used for everything is onto a winner.
Would they want to is another matter.
 

R0B

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There are always reasons why something is like it is - but the current situation could and should be looked at. I suppose it depends whether the sustainability of recreational angling can continue flying under the radar on the basis of commerciality or whether any company will have the balls to stick their head above the parapet and actually do something different.
 

Lee Richards

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Buyers market and there will be very few who will choose the more expensive option because there may be some environmental benefit.
Option A is Enviro friendly but not as good as Option B that isn't.
Which one will the user go for?
 

R0B

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Nov 17, 2020
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Buyers market and there will be very few who will choose the more expensive option because there may be some environmental benefit.
Option A is Enviro friendly but not as good as Option B that isn't.
Which one will the user go for?
I wouldn't say make an inferior product, but the same product only packaged sustainably for a start. It's worked in supermarket produce so why not in sports/hobbies? You can but plastic wrapped vegetables or you can buy loose/in paper - there is a choice. Even "very few" is better than none at all. I think tackle companies need to start looking at it, as do anglers. I know many of us just want the cheapest thing from Aliexpress and don't care about the carbon footprint - but it doesn't have to be that way.
 
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