air pressure

clare

Regular member
Joined
Feb 9, 2011
Messages
282
hello being trying to improve my catch rate being reading about air pressure affecting catch rate low pressure been the best window of oppurtunity from what i read do you guys bother with it or not .
thank you
 

ukzero1

Growing old disgracefully.
Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 3, 2004
Messages
15,405
I know some that do, but personally, I never bother with it.
 

davylad

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Nov 7, 2011
Messages
6,075
I would see how it fishes, if it's rubbish and high pressure, there's your excuse. :cool:
 

Sam Vimes

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 27, 2009
Messages
5,736
I'm quite convinced that air pressure has an influence on the feeding patterns of fish. However, I believe that influence is far more complex than a simple low pressure = good, high pressure = bad. It's much like angling text books saying that dull days are better than bright ones or a dropping river being better than a rising one. They may be good rules of thumb, but you will experience times and venues that don't conform.
 

Neil ofthe nene

Doing things differently.
Site Supporter
Joined
May 4, 2009
Messages
22,818
I don't think it's pressure itself but rapid changes that put fish off the feed. I have experienced a day when a rapid pressure change switched the fish off feeding like switching off a light.

I have read this is linked to the change affecting the swim bladder and it taking time for the fish to adapt.
 

smiffy

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 26, 2009
Messages
3,349
Stick to low pressure and you won’t go far wrong. Cloud cover and breeze in the Summer. Milder air, normally, wind and cloud in winter.
High pressure is more unfavourable but, I’ve had Roach and Rudd boiling on the surface for the seed on the very hottest, stillest of days. We’re close enough to the coast to pick up a sea breeze on the very hottest days and I’ve had Bream feeding well under the cover of the ripple.
Dont even get out of bed during high pressure in Winter😉 Normally means frosts which knocks the colour out of the river quickly and kills the fishing until dusk.
 

squimp

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 28, 2006
Messages
1,692
How long have you got ?

As Sam says air pressure has an influence on animal (fish) behaviour. But as air pressure drives our weather patterns; is it the actual pressure change that triggers the fish activity OR is it the weather change caused by the fall/rise in air pressure ?

Just to make it more complicated some fish seem to feed best in low pressure conditions and some don’t......you can probably say the same about wind, rain, sun, etc etc.

I know a keen carpangler who used to choose his swim(s) based solely on the air pressure and his perception that the actual pressure moved the fish up/down in the water column. So he fished shallow swims or zig rigs in high pressure and on the bottom in deeper swims in low pressure. Sounds good in theory - but the evidence wasn’t there. he wasn’t one of the most successful anglers on the water.

My fishing (I’m not a match angler,obviously) revolves around predicting when the particular fish I’m after are going to feed - then I move heaven and earth to be fishing at what I think are the best times. I do not routinely link my fishing activity to air pressure data.

Just for balance; there was a book written on salmon fishing a few years ago that suggested that salmon taking times were directly correlated to air pressure changes. My memory suggests the author’s name was Andrew Brett. Bear in mind that salmon don’t actually ‘feed’ in freshwater - so the connection with our coarse fish is slightly tenuous. But it is worth consideration, so I have read the book and spoken to the author.
 

Barbelcatcher

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
3,299
Low pressure = clouds and less light. Makes a difference to me on clear water natural venues.
and what influence does alcohol play on catch rates - more than air pressure you really need to change your hangover picture - its all I think about when I see it. (Think you posted it was a day after photograph of a heavy drinking session)
 

Zerkalo

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 4, 2019
Messages
9,527
and what influence does alcohol play on catch rates - more than air pressure you really need to change your hangover picture - its all I think about when I see it. (Think you posted it was a day after photograph of a heavy drinking session)
I have hereditary dark circles is all I will say. o_O :p Though I must have been drunk to post my pic...
 

Total

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 25, 2016
Messages
13,702
I don't think it's pressure itself but rapid changes that put fish off the feed. I have experienced a day when a rapid pressure change switched the fish off feeding like switching off a light.

I have read this is linked to the change affecting the swim bladder and it taking time for the fish to adapt.
Have noticed this a few times on a couple of venues we fish especially if that sudden change coincides with stormy/rainy weather...
 

BoldBear

Regular member
Joined
Aug 15, 2008
Messages
1,054
I used to be in the Meteorologist branch of the RN and worked in the Met office at Northwood and whenever my mate and I used to go fishing on the river Kennet for Barbel and Chub after a night watch in the Met Office, we used to check the Air Pressure and Air pressure tendency before we left just for an exercise to see if there was any pattern and note them down in our fishing log; and we found that:

First we needed to take both the current and previous days readings into account; and when the Air pressure had been fairly steady for a couple of days or it had been falling before remaining steady over the last couple of days then we would usually have a very productive session.
But if the Air pressure had been steadily rising or was fairly steady after a sharp rise our Barbel catches were nowhere near as good.

I don’t bother with recording air pressures or air temperatures nowerdays but I do look out for conditions when the predominant wind direction is from the west or southwest or to a lesser degree even the northwest and this is normally a much more reliable indication in my view; although this is normally accompanied by slightly warmer temperatures anyway; and often more clouded sky’s; which often behave like blankets keeping the warmth from escaping from under them. Although cloud cover doesn’t always accompany warm temperatures of course.

Now I’ve retired and am able to go fishing at a moments notice instead of having to wait till the weekends; I can look out for these conditions and can take advantage of them, I hardly ever have a blank and I can honestly say that I can only remember about two days when I’ve blanked in the last few years.

Keith
 
Last edited:

Carl t

Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2021
Messages
23
Tackle guru podcast with Simon Scott, a very interesting view and he touches on this very subject which I found fascinating as he is a biologist and carp angler so knows his onions, apologies to those who have I offend who read books and don't jump on you tube band wagon but my attention span is very poor but I can some how watch and learn from videos so needs must ( yes this post was a struggle 😂) I fish in most weathers and have the odd blank, but not many, maybe I should check the pressure that day in future🤔
 

grey

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 7, 2012
Messages
4,873
Most important thing I've discovered about fishing: if you start waiting for better conditions, then you are likely to end up never going!

It's rarely ideal weather, but you apply your fishing prediction formula and wait for the perfect day, and when it finally arrives, you catch b*gger all - leaving you scratching your head in confusion.

It's easy to pinpoint exactly how the weather affected the fishing after a day on the bank, but paradoxically, it's impossible to use the same information and knowledge to predict what's actually going to happen before you go - no matter how and accurate the weather forecast was.
 
Last edited:

Lee Richards

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2019
Messages
8,328
My largest Teme Barbel of 13lb 4oz and the two 8's caught the same day with it came "sight fishing" from a gin clear low river in the middle of Summer, the sun was blazing, sky's were clear and the temperatures had been mid to high 20s for over a week.
All of the conditions that contradict the normal advice given.

Yes using the conditions should be to your advantage but fish need to eat and they will do so when they want to and not when we think they should.
 

squimp

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 28, 2006
Messages
1,692
My largest Teme Barbel of 13lb 4oz and the two 8's caught the same day with it came "sight fishing" from a gin clear low river in the middle of Summer, the sun was blazing, sky's were clear and the temperatures had been mid to high 20s for over a week.
All of the conditions that contradict the normal advice given.

Yes using the conditions should be to your advantage but fish need to eat and they will do so when they want to and not when we think they should.
You are just better at fishing than the rest of us !
 

Zerkalo

Regular member
Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 4, 2019
Messages
9,527
It's also ironic that my PB Barbel and Roach came from a day when the Severn was the lowest I've seen it with bright sunshine, but on the same day, very few fish came out elsewhere along the stretch so it's only a very general rule for me.
 

Northantslad

'Any indications?
Joined
Aug 2, 2012
Messages
6,682
If i'm going fishing, i'm going, so don't bother with it no, but try and react to it once there, most definitely. Waiting for the perfect conditions would make my license and memberships even less value for money than they have been in the last year!
 
Top