Acolyte replacement

Zerkalo

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Biking video but relevant. They use different grades of carbon for different areas of the frame. I never feel like I could break some older rods but newer rods like Acolytes only takes a small mistake, especially new expensive rods, and you're left with a costly replacement.

 

Cobweb

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Biking video but relevant. They use different grades of carbon for different areas of the frame. I never feel like I could break some older rods but newer rods like Acolytes only takes a small mistake, especially new expensive rods, and you're left with a costly replacement.


There appears to be a moral emerging here which asks you to ask yourself to think carefully about your skills before buying a more expensive rod. Would that be the right interpretation?
 

squimp

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Higher the grade of carbon, more brittle it is, just my opinion.
If you look at the development of fly rods there are some interesting parallels.

About 10 or so years ago the top manufacturers started adding ‘nano’ particles to their carbon in an effort to strengthen the blanks. Hardy (for example) produced a range called Sintrix and single handed rods cost £600 back then. Double handers were nearly a grand. Many today say that that range of double handers are the best salmon rods ever made.

Allegedly the original blanks were made in one Far Eastern factory……I think the ‘nano’ material was exclusive to one manufacturer, possibly ‘3M’.

The blanks are actually stronger than their predecessors and take all sorts of abuse without breaking. The previous ranges of similar (non sintrix) rods were by comparison extremely fragile. My mates and I still use the original Sintrix rods for saltwater fly fishing catching fish to over 100lb. As far as I can recall we’ve never smashed one…..previously we broke rods every trip. Fly rods are routinely sold with a ‘guarantee’ against breakage which allows replacement sections to be available at a sensible cost - so there is history !

Other manufacturers now also sell similar rods that have similar properties. Hardy now even sell differently priced ranges of rods with varying grades of said Sintrix material. The latter is probably an attempt to reach the mid market as the top of the range single handers now retail at over a grand !

The latest development is the inclusion of ‘graphene’ in rod blanks. One or two manufacturers are experimenting but with mixed results……A mate has a double hander that casts miles BUT he has already broken it twice.

As far as coarse rods go; it would be interesting to know whether similar ‘nano’ blanks have been tried by the top manufacturers. Or maybe the material is already there but not marketed in the way that it has been with fly rods….

Given the prices mentioned above, I tend to buy my examples in end of range sales or second hand. I won’t pay £500 for a fishing rod, let alone a grand !
 

Alantherose

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There appears to be a moral emerging here which asks you to ask yourself to think carefully about your skills before buying a more expensive rod. Would that be the right interpretation?

Aye, that may be about right. Although my significant pole “accidents” occurred when distracted, once by my son and another time by his friend’s dad 🤦🏻‍♂️
 

Zerkalo

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There appears to be a moral emerging here which asks you to ask yourself to think carefully about your skills before buying a more expensive rod. Would that be the right interpretation?
Yes! That's me buggered then. :) I broke the tip to my Tricast Excellence waggler rod with relative ease, but the Acolyte is even more brittle feeling than that. It seems to be a trade off between weight and durability and for me I've always said I'm yet to be 100% impressed by a new expensive rod for that reason.
 

Yeoman

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Well I've got 3 Acolytes and none have broken yet, all have put in plenty of hours and caught plenty of fish, and I'm not over careful with my gear.
I stickfloat fish most of the time so I'll always take light over heavy, and at the moment I can't see how you can beat the Acolytes.
 

TiggerXFM

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I can only make comment on the accolyte float rods I have. I have them in 13 and 14ft plus's and 12ft carp waggler and all have been tested beyond what you would expect of them. I've hit and held barbel over 10lbs in weight on quite short lengths of line and the rods have been bent to a point where I fully expected them to crack off, but they never did. This wasn't a one off test either, I caught many barbel in those kind of swims and the rods were tested over and over again.
I have nothing but praise for the drennan accolyte float rods!
 

Cobweb

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Yes! That's me buggered then. :) I broke the tip to my Tricast Excellence waggler rod with relative ease, but the Acolyte is even more brittle feeling than that. It seems to be a trade off between weight and durability and for me I've always said I'm yet to be 100% impressed by a new expensive rod for that reason.
I've not damaged any of my float rod tips amongst which are a 13ft Acolyte Ultra, and the same length old 80s Spliced tip Daiwa Whisker signature rod which I paid £120 for years ago(Not Tommy Pickering's sig).- a slight misleader there as my stepson trod on the Daiwa tip and the rod now repaired is about 3 inches shorter, and better for it! I wish I could say the same for my feeder rods
 

Zerkalo

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In most situations I would rather use my 17' Shakespeare LXL Superteam instead of my 17' Acolyte despite it being a lot heavier. I feel less likely to break it but it still has a nice action. It's a fishing rod not a wand made of china for me, but people have different needs and wants.
 

Total

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In most situations I would rather use my 17' Shakespeare LXL Superteam instead of my 17' Acolyte despite it being a lot heavier. I feel less likely to break it but it still has a nice action. It's a fishing rod not a wand made of china for me, but people have different needs and wants.
Did you eventually get a replacement section for the 17 foot LXL then?:unsure:
 

Yeoman

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I can only make comment on the accolyte float rods I have. I have them in 13 and 14ft plus's and 12ft carp waggler and all have been tested beyond what you would expect of them. I've hit and held barbel over 10lbs in weight on quite short lengths of line and the rods have been bent to a point where I fully expected them to crack off, but they never did. This wasn't a one off test either, I caught many barbel in those kind of swims and the rods were tested over and over again.
I have nothing but praise for the drennan accolyte float rods!
You got the same selection as me, Tigger, my 14ft has probably had the most abuse as I use it for Barbel on the Wye, it's had some alarming pressure on it and always comes through.
 
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