Abu 507 Mk2 (mk 2) closed face reel

Skridlov

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Apr 26, 2021
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Thanks to everyone contributing to an informative and civilised discussion. I look forward to trying out that Daiwa and I'll try to immobilise the roller in some way that enables it to be manually rotated occasionally.
I'm trying to stop myself looking at the Mitchell Matches on TheBay.
 

PearTree

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The old standard dish profile of bale arm rollers that actually moved was thought to promote the line to climb up each side under retrieval. This is how the line twist was generated. Gluing the roller was thought to add a little more friction into the equation and reduce twist to some extent. Later rollers have grooves or quite severe tapers to stop the climbing.
💡💡that explains it (y)
 

Skridlov

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Apr 26, 2021
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I've now used the Daiwa for one day, on a lake in very balmy weather. I can see why it was sold "in near mint condition" - it's a horrible thing. I'm not clear how these were intended to be used. I'd assumed that they were supposed to function like a closed face reel - dab and hold the bale arm so that when casting it flies back, releasing the line. Well, mine certainly doesn't do that because no matter how hard you press the bale arm it stays put. Dabbing the bale arm firmly, having already trapped the line with a finger (exactly as you would with any conventional FS reel) it usually - usually - flies back enabling casting. That said it doesn't fly into a position where it 's completely clear of the outer spool edge although that doesn't obviously affect the cast. But far worse, quite often it only partially releases, making casting impossible. And yet worse, a further dab doesn't free it. Adding insult to injury it won't click back into the closed position unless you rotate the handle a bit after which you can reset it. Really the only way you can semi-reliably free the bale arm is by a sort of flick inward in which event it usually flies open. In what way this is superior to using ma regular FS reel beats me.
Other than that it's, er, just fine.
My search for a perfect float reel continues.
I've also posted this as a review of the Daiwa reel in a separate thread.
 

NoCarpPlease

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But there's a more fundamental problem I believe. As the spool itself reciprocates, the gap between the back edge of the spool and the back edge of the rotating line pickup rotor assembly varies constantly, exposing different parts of the line. So each time you cast, depending on how the line has settled on the spool itself, and where the spool is currently sitting, it's totally random just which part of the spooled line is showing and so which part of the spool the first loops are coming off. No wonder that the casting is so inconsistent - the initial friction varies unpredictably. Until someone does a complete re-design of how a closed face reel functions we're stuck with this problem, IMO.
Hi,

I have 5 of the original 507s ... the number of reciprocation is a whole number when compared to handle revolutions. So the reels are always at their most backward position (ie. easiest for casting) when the handle is at a certain point (I’ve adjusted all mine for that to be 6 o’clock).
I’ve also removed the circlip to allow backwinding as i don’t use clutches.

it’s disappointing if the makers have made this reel without the whole number of reciprocations per handle turn!


On my reels, the only problem that I have is the original alloy spools do not have chenille trim, so are very prone to line getting under the winding bell. I did buy a replacement machined spool with rubber washers where the chenille would go ... but that was prone to catch on the housing.
 

trotter2

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Feb 17, 2011
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Hi,

I have 5 of the original 507s ... the number of reciprocation is a whole number when compared to handle revolutions. So the reels are always at their most backward position (ie. easiest for casting) when the handle is at a certain point (I’ve adjusted all mine for that to be 6 o’clock).
I’ve also removed the circlip to allow backwinding as i don’t use clutches.

it’s disappointing if the makers have made this reel without the whole number of reciprocations per handle turn!


On my reels, the only problem that I have is the original alloy spools do not have chenille trim, so are very prone to line getting under the winding bell. I did buy a replacement machined spool with rubber washers where the chenille would go ... but that was prone to catch on the housing.
Just glue some felt top and bottom of the spoo,l , it works better than chenille.
 

PearTree

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149433273_1085287878656073_4750845094440512858_n.jpg
This came from a post on the Abu Closed Face Reels fb group.
There is felt added on the top and bottom of the original alloy spool. Later reels came with a different 'match spool'.
 

nejohn

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Over the years I have used most of the reels mentioned for running water fishing and have settled on 2 main reels those being ABU 506M and Mitchell match. Firstly some of the issues the OP might have with his ABU could be down to having too much line on the spool and the line being too heavy, I would never think of putting 6lb line on to a closed face reel and expect it to cast anything like a normal fixed spool reel. I would probably use 3lb line and only put around 40-50 metres of line on the spool. this stops the line 'bedding' in especially if you are retrieving heavy floats against a strong current or playing large fish as once the line beds in it does not come off the spool as easily as it should. Also as has been mentioned you should take note of where the spool lies when turning the handle and always cast with the handle in the position that has the spool fully visible under the 'bell' . Not really had any issues with the pick up pin not disengaging once the push button has clicked into place ( I have had issues where the button refused to click into place) so can't really help on that one. However they really should be classed as a bit of a specialist tool for fishing running water at fairly short range for small to medium sized fish and when used in conjunction with a light crisp actioned float rod can be a joy to fish with, if the intention is to fish close to lily pads for large tench then I would say it is not the ideal reel for this purpose.
As for the other reels the Mitchell in my opinion is the best by miles the line lay is sublime, the bail arm works a treat and once you get used to it turning the 'wrong way' it just seems to make sense. I thought the Ryobi was pretty good also but there is a reason you don't see many on the second hand market.....they tended to self destruct after a couple of seasons, as for the Daiwa (and this is coming from a big fan of Daiwa reels) I thought it was awful, the line lay was terrible, the bail arm was clunky compared to the Mitchell and the line twist (even after gluing the roller) could be horrendous .
When I worked in the tool room I always promised myself I would modify a Mitchell match and fit some good quality bearings and races into it just to see how smooth you can get it to feel, always kick myself for never getting round to doing it. You are never going to get rid of the noise as it is a trait of the machine cut straight gears that are used, however these are quality gears made from decent materials and machine cut unlike a lot of modern reels that use fairly soft cast gearing. Clutches don't bother me that much as I don't use them so backwind stops removed from 506's and the clutch set to give line just before the hooklength breaking with the rod under load.

I will also add that I more often than not use a Daiwa TDM/Theory/Whisker for all but close range stick float work these days and don't have a problem with those reels
 

Skridlov

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Apr 26, 2021
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Thanks for your detailed reply nejohn.
You're right of course. 6lb line on a CF reel is something short of ideal. I have the other spool fitted with 4lb and it does cast better. I tend to remember the better experiences of using CF reels and hope that they apply to the present - where I'm usually fishing in heavily lily populated lakes for decent sized Tench - often up to 5 lb. Generally speaking these days I always use slightly heavier lines with lighter hook lengths for obvious reasons.
However when I used the Abu on a fast running weedy river with the 6lb line and a heavy "Chubber" float shotted appropriately, it was a real pleasure to use. Not that I caught anything challenging!
Do you have an opinion on the impact of spool diameter when casting (floats in this case)? Obviously there are lots of factors involved but assuming they're a constant, what works better: larger or smaller spool diameter?
 

davylad

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I must be easily pleased after reading this thread. I have a couple of original 508's, and have had absolutely none of the problems with casting, line getting trapped, etc. The drag I found useless back when they first came out, so took the anti reverse pawl out, problem solved. Line getting trapped, I glued around a dozen short pieces of 15lb line to the edges, of the spool, no more issues with that. The reel can be inconsistent with line sticking as it comes off the spool when trotting, but I feed it off myself so no problem. I still use one of them for waggler fishing, mainly on still waters now and again, I reckon they're still a cracking reel.
 
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