12ft feeder rod & reel

Jimpanzee

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Good evening,

I’m after a feeder rod and reel for use on which would suitable for fishing for silvers, bream but strong enough to hold onto the odd bigger fish such as chub, tench and carp etc.

The venues I’m likely to fish are lakes, commies & the Thames throughout the seasons. What sort of Rod Oz rating should I be looking for to hold bottom when there is a stronger flow on rivers?

My budget is around £100 for both I’ve seen a couple of options but am open to suggestions.


Cadence CC5 12 Foot feeder rod combo £70 but with a spare spool and additional tips of 1 & 3oz this would top out at £100


I’ve also been looking at BobCo and come across the Daiwa Samurai reel for £30 with 3 spools. That would leave me around £70 for a feeder rod.

i did stumble across a Freenze Precision feeder rod on BobCo too but couldn’t find too much info


Any tips or advice you guys can offer would be very much appreciated.
 

Silverfisher

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Quite a challenge to get a rod to suit both silvers and decent sized carp might be a get one now another later job or get something in the middle and compromise a bit on both. The cadence is probably not a bad bet tbf ??

As for holding bottom on the Thames from the start of the season to end of October anywhere from 15-40g will be enough on the vast majority of stretches in the conditions yore likely to find at such times of year. November onwards is anyone’s guess 60g wasn’t holding last time out for me and you’d need pushing 80g plus at times.
 
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nejohn

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The frenzee precision is a very good rod and for the money it is a bit of a bargain, it is fairly versatile, it might not cover the very extremes of what you are looking for but any rod in your budget would be struggling to do everything you are asking perfectly but for the cash you could do a lot worse
 

nutmeg

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The Frenzee precision rod is a nice bit of kit for fishing Stillwaters, not sure l would contemplate using it on a strong flowing river, ok on slower paced rivers though such as my local river weaver.
 

Jimpanzee

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Quite a challenge to get a rod to suit both silvers and decent sized carp might be a get one now another later job or get something in the middle and compromise a bit on both. The cadence is probably not a bad bet tbf ??

As for holding bottom on the Thames from the start of the season to end of October anywhere from 15-40g will be enough on the vast majority of stretches in the conditions yore likely to find at such times of year. November onwards is anyone’s guess 60g wasn’t holding last time out for me and you’d need pushing 80g plus at times.
Sorry I didn’t mean to confuse things, whilst not specifically targeting larger fish, my main aim would be smaller species up to the 5lb mark, primarily silvers but if the I had hooked the odd smallish carp (below 10lb) i would like the opportunity to land it without breaking the rod.
Perhaps I’m being unrealistic with my aims and budget?

Thanks for the info on the Thames, it gives a good indication of what I’m looking for.


The frenzee precision is a very good rod and for the money it is a bit of a bargain, it is fairly versatile, it might not cover the very extremes of what you are looking for but any rod in your budget would be struggling to do everything you are asking perfectly but for the cash you could do a lot worse

The Frenzee precision rod is a nice bit of kit for fishing Stillwaters, not sure l would contemplate using it on a strong flowing river, ok on slower paced rivers though such as my local river weaver.
Thanks chaps - do you recommend 2 different rods then? One for commercials & one for stronger flowing rivers? If so what type of rod would you recommend for heavier rods? A heavy/power type feeder rod?

@Silverfisher - How many rods/types of rods do you use to cover your Thames feeder fishing?
 

nejohn

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Sorry I didn’t mean to confuse things, whilst not specifically targeting larger fish, my main aim would be smaller species up to the 5lb mark, primarily silvers but if the I had hooked the odd smallish carp (below 10lb) i would like the opportunity to land it without breaking the rod.
Perhaps I’m being unrealistic with my aims and budget?

Thanks for the info on the Thames, it gives a good indication of what I’m looking for.





Thanks chaps - do you recommend 2 different rods then? One for commercials & one for stronger flowing rivers? If so what type of rod would you recommend for heavier rods? A heavy/power type feeder rod?

@Silverfisher - How many rods/types of rods do you use to cover your Thames feeder fishing?
A general feeder rod like the one you have looked at will cover most applications with a little care in the choice of line weight and feeder weight. There are however exceptions to this like if you intend to fish powerful fast moving rivers like the tidal trent, Severn or parts of the the Wye for example then you are going to need a rod that is capable of casting the weights required to hold bottom and also not be bent double with just the force of the flow, or if you intend to fish at extreme distance or even at very close distance then you will need specialist rods that are specifically designed for these applications. But for everyday use on stillwaters and slow to medium flow rivers a medium feeder rod of 11-12ft will cover most of your needs unless you are specifically targeting large fish when a more powerful rod would be prudent.
I wouldn't worry to much about breaking a rod as with care you can land very large fish on even the lightest of rods (I wouldn't recommend making a habit of it though) the trick is balance your tackle, ie match the line strength and hook and hook length to the power of the rod and if you do connect with something large take your time and even if you do lose the fish the hooklengths should break long before the rod. The only times I have seen rods break due to the size of the fish have almost always been due to bad angling such as fishing far to heavy line for a rod and then trying to bully a large fish or one common mistake is allowing a large fish to get under a platform and when the rod is already hooped back on itself then applying even more pressure. I have only ever broken 3 rods in over 40 years of angling, I trod on one, trapped one on the car boot and one snapped on its 1st ever cast and was replaced by the manufacturer and in that time I have landed 20lb+ carp and 9lb+ barbel on light float rods and size 20 hooks to 1.5lb hook lengths (not intentionally I might add)
 

Silverfisher

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@Silverfisher - How many rods/types of rods do you use to cover your Thames feeder fishing?
I’m only a few years into feeder fishing so I’m rather under equipped for it at the moment on the river front. I mostly just use an 11ft drennan acolyte ultra which is perfect for the first half of the season but isn’t much cop at the moment as with all the rain it can’t cast big enough feeders to hold bottom. Was going to get an 11ft drennan twin tip duo for such conditions but having to put that off at the minute until I sort my car situation.
 

Jimpanzee

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A general feeder rod like the one you have looked at will cover most applications with a little care in the choice of line weight and feeder weight. There are however exceptions to this like if you intend to fish powerful fast moving rivers like the tidal trent, Severn or parts of the the Wye for example then you are going to need a rod that is capable of casting the weights required to hold bottom and also not be bent double with just the force of the flow, or if you intend to fish at extreme distance or even at very close distance then you will need specialist rods that are specifically designed for these applications. But for everyday use on stillwaters and slow to medium flow rivers a medium feeder rod of 11-12ft will cover most of your needs unless you are specifically targeting large fish when a more powerful rod would be prudent.
I wouldn't worry to much about breaking a rod as with care you can land very large fish on even the lightest of rods (I wouldn't recommend making a habit of it though) the trick is balance your tackle, ie match the line strength and hook and hook length to the power of the rod and if you do connect with something large take your time and even if you do lose the fish the hooklengths should break long before the rod. The only times I have seen rods break due to the size of the fish have almost always been due to bad angling such as fishing far to heavy line for a rod and then trying to bully a large fish or one common mistake is allowing a large fish to get under a platform and when the rod is already hooped back on itself then applying even more pressure. I have only ever broken 3 rods in over 40 years of angling, I trod on one, trapped one on the car boot and one snapped on its 1st ever cast and was replaced by the manufacturer and in that time I have landed 20lb+ carp and 9lb+ barbel on light float rods and size 20 hooks to 1.5lb hook lengths (not intentionally I might add)
Thanks for the informative Post Nejohn. Based on what you’ve described, I suspect the Frenzee Precision rod should cover me in 90% of scenarios, It’s capable of casting up to 90g and it’s very likely I wouldn’t have to go to that limit too often. The minimum tip it seems to come with is 1.5oz, will that be sensitive enough for small silvers?
I’ll try to do some further reading on the rod today, but I’m very tempted to put an order in.
 

Silverfisher

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Thanks for the informative Post Nejohn. Based on what you’ve described, I suspect the Frenzee Precision rod should cover me in 90% of scenarios, It’s capable of casting up to 90g and it’s very likely I wouldn’t have to go to that limit too often. The minimum tip it seems to come with is 1.5oz, will that be sensitive enough for small silvers?
I’ll try to do some further reading on the rod today, but I’m very tempted to put an order in.
1.5oz tip is what I mostly use on the Thames, you get pretty positive bites in the flow so I find it plenty light enough.
 

Silverfisher

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Ideal thanks. Have you found the same on stillwaters too?
If my memory serves correctly I’ve only feeder fished a stillwater once as it’s completely unnecessary on the usually maximum football/rugby pitch sized lakes I tend to fish. The one time I did it was on reservoir for decent sized bream but I doubt you’d have a problem seeing bites from smaller fish either as it’s still quite a delicate tip.
 

baggy

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I’ve got the frenzee rod, it is very pokey. I wouldn’t use it for silvers but it’s great for decent chucks for carp.
 

Jimpanzee

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I’ve got the frenzee rod, it is very pokey. I wouldn’t use it for silvers but it’s great for decent chucks for carp.

Is that the Precision or Power range? If the former that could lead me to a rethink..
 

Jimpanzee

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Thanks for the info Baggy..I’ll keep options open for the time being. Black Friday next week too..
 

Jimpanzee

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Hi all, just a quick update -

It does seem as if I’ve purchased a rod at the worst possible time with Covid (as I’ve been told by a few tackle shops already.) Higher prices and limited choice driven by Covid & the influx of new anglers looking to take up the sport. It was a toss up of sitting around waiting for a bargain but wasting valuable fishing time or getting out there and buying something for close to full price.

In the ended I’ve gone for a Daiwa Yank N Bank 12ft feeder rod & Daiwa Ninja 3012 reel.

The 3x tips covering 1-3oz was a factor in my decision as was the the ease of which you can get hold of replacement/additional tips in composition to the Frenzee Precision. The extra backbone on the Yank n Bank will hopefully help in winter river fishing.

I am conscious about how it will handle silvers but I’ll see how it goes and if it’s struggle, I may look at a 10/11ft lighter rod in Spring/Summer next year.
Thanks all for the advice and guidance.
 

Jimpanzee

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I just had a phone call from Matchman supplies who are unable to fulfil the order for the Yank N Bank 12” rod. I can either the purchase the rod full price from AD (£83) or wait for something else to crop up. I’m in 2 minds, is the Yank N Bank worth full price?

Next year, I had planned to purchased a 10 ft Ninja feeder rod for small ponds & lakes primarily for silver fishing. I could always bump this up the priority list and look for an all round 12ft rod next year..
 

Jimpanzee

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Hey guys, sorry you are probably sick of me by now ??

I’ve ended up purchasing the 2 rods this afternoon.
A 12ft6 quiver Greys feeder rod for heavier distance & river work.


I have also purchased a 10ft Daiwa Ninja Feeder rod to cover small venues.

I feel this covers 99 percent of my feeder fishing needs at just over a 100 notes. I just hope both rods are in stock.
 
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