The Big One Talks - Andy May, Steve Ringer

Neil ofthe nene

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At The Big One show yesterday I took notes during Steve and Andy's talks. The following is written from those. Hopefully some things for people to consider if they were not there.

The points I noted from Stever Ringer's talk on feeder fishing-

Most important thing is accuracy in distance and direction. Use the rod to its full potential and always punch the cast out strongly, you will NOT break the rod.

Cast with the feeder hanging about halfway down the rod length.

Use the left hand (if you are right handed) on the butt of the rod to generate the speed of the cast, don't try and increase power by throwing the shoulder into the cast. Steve has recently had a casting coaching session to improve his casting, not something many would think of doing.

Stop the rod on the cast at a 45 degree angle to the horizontal - the most efficient angle for the line to flow through the rings.

If fishing open water consider using measuring sticks to establish the distance to be cast. Particularly in Winter do not cast into the water to establish distance. Fish can spook with multiple casts so your first cast into the water should be after the whistle. Keep records as to at what distance you caught on previous visits to the lake so you can measure off that distance with sticks.

Load a hybrid feeder by putting in a layer of pellets first, squeeze this layer as hard as possible. Place the hookbait and hook (flat) on this layer then load the top with more pellets but not as tightly squeezed as the base layer.

Before switching lines with the feeder feed that line first with two quick casts using a bigger feeder. Leave 20 minutes then try it with a smaller feeder (Winter).

Don't be afraid of using a large hook for any species. 10 if allowed.

A strong undertow will render it pointless fishing the feeder for more than five minutes per cast as the pellets will be washed away by then.

Use a “wafter” type bait held down on the bottom layer of pellets on the feeder by the weight of the hook.

Tight line or slack to the feeder? If elasticated then slightly slack to reduce line bites, in line - tight with a slight bend in the tip.


And Any May's talk on tackling open water lake swims in the Spring.

Andy is convinced that white/grey painted tops help when fishing shallow, up in the water or shallow margin.

Start on the topkit plus 2/3 line looking for a slight slope that should be free of silt. Feed this with 6 mil hard pellet thrown in. Andy feeds twice in quick succession. The first 8-10 pellets attract fish with the noise the next take the fish down to the hookbait on the bottom.

Plumb up to the bottom of the bristle and lay the rig in the water away from you so it settles on the slope.

When this line starts to tail off feed at 13m with a ball of micros. Andy does not trust where loose micros may end up so feeds a squeezed ball. He also, I think, mentioned feeding just 1 expander with the micros.

He prefers a wire stemmed float for fishing on the deck.

He suggests that you should line the butt of the pole with a fixed point like a box leg rather than your elbow. The box leg is fixed, your elbow could be in different positions depending on how you change your seating position. This ensures accuracy of distance otherwise you may be a few inches from your feed.

Look for signs like line bites that fish are coming up in the water and switch to shallow for a more efficient catch rate. A small change in depth can be the difference between catching and not. He uses a 4x8 float with a bristle and string of No.11s to give a slow fall of the hard banded pellet, 6 or 8mil. Use a thick main line to slow the fall through the water. I also noticed that his hooklength/mainline loops were two inches long, I asked why and he said “for the same reason, to slow the fall of the bait”. Carbon or glass stem for the same reason and to keep a straight line from float to hook.

On a snake lake he would look to start long and come short, the opposite to an open water swim on a large lake.

Asked for his three top tips they were

1. Feeding.

2. Make sure tackle is balanced through elastic to line, hooklength, hook and float.

3. Have fun, first and foremost you should enjoy your fishing.
 

Pokerstar

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Great stuff @Neil ofthe nene, thank you sir.

Interesting that Jamie Hughes says the hook should be upright ( point outwards) in the feeder?
 

Neil ofthe nene

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There are no absolutes - except "Don't move the feeder!"

I forgot to mention that Steve said if you suspect the feeder has moved then reel in and re-cast. Pointless sitting on a moved feeder.
 

Dave

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I beg to differ on this point..
Most important thing is accuracy in distance and direction. Use the rod to its full potential and always punch the cast out strongly, you will NOT break the rod.

:D :D
 

Arry

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I beg to differ on this point..



:D:D
I agree... there are times whem moving the feeder can induce a bite.... maybe at the end of a chuck just twitch it back a few inches to a foot....

There was a time, a few years BM (Before Methods) when casting out and pulling your feeder back so the hookbait sat smack in the middle of your pile of feed was the accepted norm... maybe with the shorter hooklinks with the method feeder this doesn't work so well but it's certainly still relevant with 1' plus hooklinks
 

Neil ofthe nene

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I think @Dave may have been referring to breaking rods.

I also forgot to mention something from Steve Ringer I didn't note at the time because it is something I already do. That is to time when bites occur on the feeder. Steve uses a stopwatch he keeps on his side tray, I use an ordinary digital watch laid on the platform under the rod. As Steve said, it is amazing how you can see a pattern as regards time from casting to bite. In Winter it can be 7-15 minutes or more. Yesterday it was 4 minutes.

13988

Note the position of the watch so that I can glance at it while watching the rod.
 

MrBen

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Thank you for the write up, interesting, definitely agree on the timing when fishing the feeder.
 

Dave

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Yes, I was referring to the breaking of rods, or more specifically my rod when casting out a feeder last year at Alders :)
 

Dave

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14002

Neil, is that the latest Guru hard peg rod stop ?
 

Dave

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I think my casting prowess drove the fish to the far end of the lake :p
 

62tucker

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And notice a nice Camo bucket a Camo bait box and ice cream tub. Bet they had carp tax on 🤔
 

Pokerstar

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I agree... there are times whem moving the feeder can induce a bite.... maybe at the end of a chuck just twitch it back a few inches to a foot....

There was a time, a few years BM (Before Methods) when casting out and pulling your feeder back so the hookbait sat smack in the middle of your pile of feed was the accepted norm... maybe with the shorter hooklinks with the method feeder this doesn't work so well but it's certainly still relevant with 1' plus hooklinks
After watching an underwater video ( I think it was matrix) of feeder fishing I’m not sure long hooklengths are a good idea on a still water, unless aiming to catch as the bait falls.
As the feeder lands, due to its weight it will sink first. The hooklength will sink slower, and from vertically above the feeder, landing on top of or close to the feeder. With a long hooklength this means the fish can pick up the bait and have a relatively long piece of slack line to reject the hookbait without ever registering a bite.
Moving a feeder with a longer hooklength might therefore be an advantage?
I assume Steve Ringer is referring to feeders with short hooklengths?
Perhaps one of the keys to the success of method type feeders is the fact that the short hooklength employed means more bites are registered on the tip?
 

fishcatcher4

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After watching an underwater video ( I think it was matrix) of feeder fishing I’m not sure long hooklengths are a good idea on a still water, unless aiming to catch as the bait falls.
As the feeder lands, due to its weight it will sink first. The hooklength will sink slower, and from vertically above the feeder, landing on top of or close to the feeder. With a long hooklength this means the fish can pick up the bait and have a relatively long piece of slack line to reject the hookbait without ever registering a bite.
Moving a feeder with a longer hooklength might therefore be an advantage?
I assume Steve Ringer is referring to feeders with short hooklengths?
Perhaps one of the keys to the success of method type feeders is the fact that the short hooklength employed means more bites are registered on the tip?

If i saw the same video it was interesting that even with a 3ft hooklength the hook never landed further than 12" from the feeder.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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My apologies, I realise I didn't make it clear that Steve was talking about the Hybrid feeder and by association all Method type feeders.

These feeders are designed to be fished with short hooklengths. The fish should basically hook itself, first against the weight of the feeder and then against the tip.

The point about not moving the feeder is that these types of feeder are intended to present a discreet area/pile of free offerings with your hookbait in the middle.

Open end type feeders are more generally intended to build up an area of feed over which the target species, normally bream and roach, graze and eventually pick up the hookbait that should stand out as something different against the feed. The intention is to build up a shoal of feeding fish on your baited area thus increasing the chances of any one of a number of fish picking up the hookbait.

I see it as a legitimate tactic to move the open end feeder and thus straighten the tail and allow the fish full access to the groundbait. I am also happy to move a pellet feeder for the same reasons.
 

abbo27

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I think @Dave may have been referring to breaking rods.

I also forgot to mention something from Steve Ringer I didn't note at the time because it is something I already do. That is to time when bites occur on the feeder. Steve uses a stopwatch he keeps on his side tray, I use an ordinary digital watch laid on the platform under the rod. As Steve said, it is amazing how you can see a pattern as regards time from casting to bite. In Winter it can be 7-15 minutes or more. Yesterday it was 4 minutes.

View attachment 13988

Note the position of the watch so that I can glance at it while watching the rod.
That is interesting. I use a watch, as I set myself a max time of 15 minutes when bomb fishing before a recast, based on nothing else than it feels about right. I was fishing a match last week and the fish came in fits and starts from one on the drop to just over the 15 minutes, as I always give it another 30 seconds and wind back once , just to see if anything takes the bait as it moves. Most fish were taken towards the 15 minute mark. I am always left wondering if I would catch more by recasting after 10 minutes with a change of baits or longer, shorter, or giving an unproductive cast another 5.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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My own way is to leave the first cast 15 minutes in Winter, less time in Summer. Hopefully that starts to give me a clue as to if and when the fish will come to the feeder. If I don't get a bite in that time then I would consider changing feeder and/or hookbait but not until I have had a look on the pole line as I would much rather fish the pole than the leger. If the pole isn't producing then I need to seriously attack the feeder line with changes of feeder and bait.
 
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