Pond aerator

Sportsman

Regular member
Joined
May 9, 2008
Messages
6,905
I am looking to get more dissolved oxygen into the pond water and was wondering about using a submersible fountain pump.
If you set it with the nozzle sub surface, so that you don't actually get the fountain effect, then it should churn the surface up quite well, shouldn't it?
Has anyone tried it and did it work?
 

dry nets

apprentice stormtrooper
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 26, 2005
Messages
7,873
You can get small air pumps for under £40. Add a stone like Dave says. Size of pump will depend on depth of pond. Always remember to sit pump above water level.
 

Sportsman

Regular member
Joined
May 9, 2008
Messages
6,905
Thanks both. I am sure that I read somewhere that air pumps and stones were not as effective as stirring up the surface.
We have just had a week of over 30* temps, so I feel that a bit extra oxygen would be helpful. Costwise there is nothing to choose as far as I can see, so it is just what works best. How big a diffuser stone would you use? I assume the larger stones require a more powerful pump.
 

Dave

Red Leader
Staff member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 8, 2001
Messages
56,005
I have a 200mm diameter stone fed by an air pump and use it in the summer months on a timer so that it comes on during the night
 

spanky

Irregular Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 28, 2007
Messages
8,491
If I was building my pond again, I'd defo put an air diffuser ring on the bottom drain and run the air pipe out through the 4 inch pipework. However... it's not an easy retro fit in my case. I could run airlines in via the side of the pond but this would be unsightly and I don't like obstructing the view of the fish with the rising air bubbles.

So...I aerate the filter instead and in over ten years have had no air-related issues with the fish.

The trick here is to avoid the pressure drop you get from using a manifold on the airpump. So I connect the air pump to some 21.5mm overflow pipe (it'll fit with some light persuasion, assuming it comes with a short rubber tube to connect the manifold) and then via a couple of elbows I run the air pipe the length of the filter with the far end of the pipe blocked off. At periodic intervals I've drilled a hole and glued in a 4mm airline connector, these in turn have a short piece of airline and an airstone attached. I think I have about 15 airstones in the filter in total which ensures that the water is sufficiently aerated and keeps the K1/K3 beds moving at all times.

I can post pictures if anyone is interested in finding out more.
 

dry nets

apprentice stormtrooper
Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 26, 2005
Messages
7,873
As spanks says.
I’ve added an air stone to the corner that doesn’t get moved a lot. As well as air into water it’ll move the water around in that corner and stop kak gathering. I’ve used sinking air line and ran it down the side.
You’ll know if your fish are struggling they’ll gasp for air at the surface 37734AE6-470D-4481-B2CB-33F8B9805D40.jpeg 37734AE6-470D-4481-B2CB-33F8B9805D40.jpeg
 

Sportsman

Regular member
Joined
May 9, 2008
Messages
6,905
Thanks again
I am getting some oxygen into my filter. The water comes from the pump, into the top of the filter. It is connected into 30mm plastic pipe which, with the aid of 4 90* connectors and 2 T connectors I have made into a rectangular shape with a crossbar.
I drilled holes into the pipe and attached it to the lid, so a steady rain of water falls all over the surface, and if bubbles are anything to go by it works.
Like tucker says, I don't think you can have too much oxygen, particularly given how dry and hot it gets here in the summer.
 

spanky

Irregular Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 28, 2007
Messages
8,491
The amount of dissolved oxygen water in water changes with temperature - as the temp rises the amount that can stay dissolved drops (see table below). The change from say, 25 to 30 degrees is not that much (8.24 mg/L to 7.54 mg/L) but that's the maximum it can hold not necessary the amount it will hold under normal conditions. So if you have an artificially high biological load in the water (such as a fish pond) so it makes sense to aerate the water and watch the fish carefully when it gets hot.

You cannot increase the level of oxygen in the water above the limits below, but you can make sure as much opportunity for dissolving takes place by introducing a disturbance (waterfall etc.) or air bubbles. Either method (or both) if done in sufficient quantities should be fine. You cant overdose on oxygen, but you could waste money by adding additional aeration (say multiple air pumps) above and beyond what's necessary.

On a side note, too much dissolved oxygen can be a problem (theoretically) in the winter when temps fall, but I've never had a problem and run my air pump 24/7/365.

1590250601420.png
 
Top