Hooklength Lines

OII Jazz IIO

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I'm wondering what you guys recommend for this and have a few questions/thoughts so please bear with me.

Currently, for my mainlines on my float rod, I am using Daiwa Sensor 4lb at 0.200 and Sensor 6lb at 0.24 and have been pairing that mainline with hooklengths I make with Drennan Supplex 3lb at 0.129 or 4.9lb at 0.16 and have not had any trouble. However, my last session was an absolute pig and it just kept breaking and consequently, I have lost some faith in the stuff but I've been thinking more carefully about this I have realised that the line diameters sort of don't make sense. For example, My Sensor 6lb mainline is 0.24 and I'm using the Supplex which "claims" to have a breaking weight of 4.9lb and a diameter of 0.16. Well, that seems quite thin for that breaking strain relative to the Daiwa sensor and makes me wonder if I should actually be using Supplex at 5.8lb and 0.18 or even 6.9lb at 0.20. Even though they are rated at about the same weight or stronger than my mainline. Maybe the Supplex is actually fine and their breaking weights are off and I should just use a stronger one. Or maybe it's just not up to the job.

Now, I realise I could just buy a load of different lines and tie a load of different hooklengths and attach them to my mainlines and pull on them until they break and keep going up until it's my mainline that breaks as opposed to my hooklengths. Then I will know the limit but this strikes me as a relatively expensive way of going about it and considering there is such a wealth of experience here I figured I would just ask what do or would you guys use with those two mainlines? Should I ignore the breaking weights consider them cobblers and buy thicker stuff or buy different stuff entirely?

I'd appreciate your thoughts.
 

ukzero1

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@OII Jazz IIO
Everybody will have their own preferences, here's mine, depending on what I'm targeting.
Here's what I use for hook lengths and rig lines. The Lo-Viz I use 0.14 and 0.16 respectively.

100_1641 (175x130).jpg



The Konger I use in 0.12 and 0.14. respectively.

Rig Line.JPG
 

Neil ofthe nene

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First question has to be target species and conditions - river, lake etc.

Now to the technical stuff.

There are basically two types of line, reel line and "high tech" or pre-stretched lines intended for pole rig and hooklengths. Reel line will be much thicker for a given BS than the high tech stuff. Reel lines need to be tougher all round A. to withstand casting shock and B. to resist wear through repeated casting and retrieval.

People will often pair a reel line with a high tech hooklength of the same or higher BS. This seems illogical. The reason this is done is that the shorter length of high tech is less able to withstand a shock load than the thicker, longer and more stretchy reel line. The BS of lines is tested and labelled using a steady pull test, not a sudden shock load (as can be imparted by a large fish shaking it's head or a sudden dive under the rod tip). In Material Science terms the reel line is tough, the hooklength brittle. On a pole of course the brittle high tech line is protected from a shock loading by the elastic.

Most anglers distinguish between high Tech and reel lines by referring to the former by diameter and the latter by BS. In the main the diameter of reel line is immaterial. There are therefore advantages to having a thicker reel line and thinner hooklength both of the same BS or the hooklength higher.

The High Tech line I use is Preston Reflo Power. It is generally accepted that this line is actually around 0.02mm thicker than labelled. But for now I will use the labelled diameter and BS. 0.17 (0.19?) Reflo is stated to be 6lb 12oz BS, 0.15 (0.17?) 5lb 14oz.

On the pole I regularly use 0.13 (0.15?) 4lb 12oz Reflo as a hooklength with a main of 0.17 (0.19?) and land fish far in excess of the thinner line's BS. Unless foulhooked fish can rarely impart a pull equal to their weight.

The test you refer to of using different lines and testing by pulling really has no relation to the stresses the lines undergo in actual use and thus would not provide a suitable basis for choosing one over another.

In the long run we need to select a line that gets us sufficient bites without losing a significant number of fish through breakages. As each angler, the way they play fish, their tackle and circumstances differ it is difficult to give precise advice. You really do have to find what works best for you. But understanding the technical aspects of lines helps provide a starting point.
 

T.I

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For Sensor you can add around 2lb to the stated breaking strain.

I would not go much heavier then the mainline especially if the hooklength is longer than 6".

Taking a look at supplex then upto 0.16 seems reasonable for 4lb sensor and upto 0.20 for 6lb sensor.
 

Zerkalo

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Tomorrow I'll be pairing 8lb Pro Gold mainline with a pretied 8lb Preston Hair Rig (presume they use Preston Reflo Power for that) and I expect the hooklength, being prestretched, will give before the mainline for reasons stated above (basically because it's prestretched).
 

TrickyD

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I too am on the lookout for new hooklength line, my Milo match carp spools are almost empty, can't find it any more. Ideally I'd like 50m spools as I don't know if it deteriorates over time, this could be OP's problem, he also raises this point..........
Supplex which "claims" to have a breaking weight of 4.9lb and a diameter of 0.16. Well, that seems quite thin for that breaking strain relative to the Daiwa
the disclaimer on this spool may be a reason (the image is quite small, but if you google it, you will see better)

1567895161072.png
 

OII Jazz IIO

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Thanks, guys! some really useful info here. I have decided to buy a few spools and different diameters of the Preston Reflo Power. It's the stuff people keep bringing up and I will just have to trial an error it until I find something that works for me.
 

Maesknoll

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6lb sensor is awfully heavy for float fishing, for most circumstances - you don’t say what you are fishing for where?
 

BoldBear

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I always liked to use Drennan Floatfish and Drennan Supplex when on the float, however I have moved on to a line that Mark Wintle mentioned that he used on another forum which was the <Dave Harrell Pro Float line> which is superb.

It does everything that Floatfish does but it’s even better.

Plus it comes on 300 mtr spools too unlike Drennans Floatfish and Supplex which only come on 100mtr spools so is compatible for use on other reels besides Drennans that come with shallow match spools and line spacers.

Keith
 
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Northantslad

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Maxima mainline for everything.
4lb main 3lb kamasan hooklength, soft float rod (maver abyss x), for mixed commercials, clutch set quite loose if carp show up.
Rivers and for mixed species drop that down each by a 1lb.
 

OII Jazz IIO

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6lb sensor is awfully heavy for float fishing, for most circumstances - you don’t say what you are fishing for where?
I lean toward 6lb when I am on commercial fisheries where it's highly likely for me to pick up a couple of nosey carp during the day. There are a couple of waters I visit where this is common.

When that's not the case I favour something around the 4lb mark.
 

Captain Pugwash

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I use silstar match and beyer perlon for hook lengths after losing confidence in supplex, although I really like drennan products.
 

Silverfisher

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For 95% of my float fishing I use 4lb maxima for the mainline and generally use pre-tied kamasan or drennan hooks to nylon. Born out of convenience but never really found a need to make my own hook lengths for float fishing as they work perfectly well for me. I buy them in 18s to 2lb, 2lb 4oz, 2lb 8oz, 2lb 12oz, 3lb and 3lb 6oz and 16s to 3lb and 3lb 8oz and generally prefer the longer ones of say 10 to 12 inches.
 

Maesknoll

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I lean toward 6lb when I am on commercial fisheries where it's highly likely for me to pick up a couple of nosey carp during the day. There are a couple of waters I visit where this is common.

When that's not the case I favour something around the 4lb mark.
I use 4lb for all commercial work in the summer and drop to 3lb in the winter, never had an issue, will go down to 2.5lb if targeting Silvers specifically.
 

Silverfisher

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On the very rare occasions I actively target carp on the float I'll go with 6lb but I use 4lb for all other float fishing. Well I've got 3lb on my centre pin but that rarely gets used.
 

davepellet

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to be honest I've not looked at breaking strains of hi-tech hooklength lines for years, and I must admit since I stopped fishing matches, I've even stopped getting so concerned about the difference between 0.12 and 0.129 diameters...

with hooklengths for me the most important factor is suppleness, and Drennan Supplex (the clue is in the name) is absolutely superb in this respect

I've been using this for all my hooklengths (pole, stick float, waggler, feeder & when I used to use it, method feeder) and pole rig line since it first came out & I would be absolutely gutted if they stopped doing it, I can't say with any authority it's better than anything else because since I've been using it I've not used anything else, so I have no comparison, I can only compare it to what I used before, which was Drennan Team England Rig Line, Shimano Antares Silk Shock, Super Shinobi and before those I think it was Silstar Matchteam.

I did try it as a reel line when it first came out, but didn't get on with it, but that's not what it's designed for


One thing to remember, the Drennan Supplex supplied on 50m & 100m spools is the same line
it's the labelling that can come across as misleading, on the 50m spools they are aimed more at pole anglers, so diameter is the key factor, on the 100m spools they are aiming at running line anglers and therefore they generalise on breaking strains (with a little bit of rounding to make nice whole numbers)
 

davepellet

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not wishing to sound like a nob BoldBear, and I apologise if this sounds hostile (I really don't mean it that way) but when would you ever need more than 100m of line on a reel for coarse fishing in the UK, especially float fishing?
 

Silverfisher

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I took him to mean that whilst 100m of drennan float fish might sit perfectly on a drennan reel a different brand might need a few more metres so the bigger spools of line offer more flexibity as to what reel you use. I tend to buy maxima in decent sized spools for that reason.
 

davepellet

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I still pad all my deeper spools out with thin string, a layer of tight electrician tape, and my line of choice on the top
not wishing to sound tight but I am from Yorkshire
 

BoldBear

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I still pad all my deeper spools out with thin string, a layer of tight electrician tape, and my line of choice on the top
not wishing to sound tight but I am from Yorkshire
I have a couple of relations that live in Yorkshire so I’m familiar with their reluctance to spend their dosh unnecesarily (only kidding) :)

I have several light match reels that either have very shallow spools like the Drennan FD’s which take 100mtrs of lighter line (I have one of these), or have spool reducers to use when loading lighter lines like the Shimano Arial FA Match reels (I have one of these too); so having to pad out deeper spools so that they will take finer diameter lines using line/string/tape etc. is just not necessary these days (thank god). However many of these modern spool reducers that some of the better match reels include in their boxes take a little more than 100 mtrs of line and actually take more like 200 mtrs of fine line making Drennans 100mtr spools of line a little too restrictive unless you are loading it onto a Drennan reel.

NB: Does Drennan originate from Yorkshire too?.

Keith
 
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