Environment Agency removes more invasive non-native fish

Dave

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Topmouth Gudgeon and invasive fish has been removed from a Leicester lake

Published 9 May 2019

From: Environment Agency



Topmouth Gudgeon are native to Asia, but have spread rapidly throughout Europe. The invasive fish poses a significant threat to the ecology and wildlife of our rivers and lakes

Topmouth Gudgeon are native to Asia, but have spread rapidly throughout Europe. The invasive fish poses a significant threat to the ecology and wildlife of our rivers and lakes, and the fisheries that they support. The Environment Agency is carrying out a programme to eradicate the species from our waterways.

The Environment Agency has eradicated Topmouth Gudgeon from a pond in Leicestershire as part of the campaign to protect England’s waterways from invasive non-native fish.
Topmouth Gudgeon are native to Asia, but have spread rapidly throughout Europe. The invasive fish poses a significant threat to the ecology and wildlife of our rivers and lakes, and the fisheries that they support. The Environment Agency is carrying out a programme to eradicate the species from our waterways.
The silver coloured fish outcompete our native fish for food and habitat, and can also spread disease and parasites that pose a threat to our native species.
The Leicestershire pond, which the owner does not want to be identified, is one of 34 known sites across England and Wales where the invasive fish have been found.

Through our eradication work, and working with fisheries, the Environment Agency has reduced Topmouth Gudgeon to three known populations, with one other site under investigation. Along the way, we have eradicated the only known populations of black bullhead catfish and fat-head minnow – both were threats to our ecology and fisheries.

Kevin Austin, Head of Fisheries at the Environment Agency, said:
Invasive species pose a serious threat to our native wildlife and cost the UK economy a massive £1.8 billion a year. It’s important that Topmouth Gudgeon and other damaging invasive species are removed because of the risk they pose to the environment, including our fisheries.

We are working hard to eradicate these invasive non-native fish; they eat the eggs and larvae of our native fish and can carry a parasite that poses a threat to native species. As Topmouth Gudgeon reproduce rapidly, spawning up to four times a year, they can significantly reduce stocks of native fish by outcompeting them for food and habitat.
Jake Dorey, Fisheries Technical Officer for the Environment Agency in the East Midlands, said:
We have worked closely with the owners and other organisations to eradicate Topmouth Gudgeon from the pond in Leicestershire. If the fish had been allowed to escape and spread, they could have had a serious impact on native wildlife and habitats in other waters.
Invasive Species Week
Next week (13 – 17 May) is Invasive Species Week and the Environment Agency is working with organisations across the UK to raise awareness of invasive non-native species to help prevent their spread, to protect the environment and recreational spaces for future generations to enjoy.
For more information about invasive non-native species and Invasive Species Week visit: GB non-native species secretariat
To ensure the continued success of this work, the Environment Agency is asking members of the public to report any sightings of Topmouth Gudgeon, or other invasive fish species by calling 03708 506 506.
 

Aston_fisher

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Interesting, had never heard of a topmouth gudgeon before.

Mind, I'm still trying to catch a normal gudgeon for the micro species thread :D

Thanks for the info Dave
 

brian carragher

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They did something similar a few years back over the lake district ( think its the right location) and totally killed all the fish life in the water to make sure non of the little buggers survived

They (the EA) do take it pretty seriously when it comes to the topmouth
 

Tinca Steve

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They wiped out all 17 lakes at Clawford Vineyard in Devon a few years back. John Ray lost every single fish. All because of some topmouth gudgeon in one pond, the whole site was poisoned. The dead fish were also put into holes to rot down on site.
 

rudd

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When are they starting on crayfish, zebra mussels, zander and ethnic minorities who no spek inglesh when caught poaching?
 

Trogg

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When are they starting on crayfish, zebra mussels, zander and ethnic minorities who no spek inglesh when caught poaching?

Of course you are only talking about the signal crayfish and not our native ones i assume?

Other species they can wipe out are the bitterling, the Wels, the grass carp and all members of the king carp family (mirror, leather, common) , sturgeon and sterlet.

The aquarist shops should also be banned from selling any imported fish that can survive and possibly breed in our climate, i wonder what the count is for the amount of people who have fish then get bored of them or have to get rid of them for some reason and release them into the nearest brook, river, pool or canal without thought?
 

ukzero1

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i wonder what the count is for the amount of people who have fish then get bored of them or have to get rid of them for some reason and release them into the nearest brook, river, pool or canal without thought?
This has happened on our club waters. a couple of years ago, members started catching Koi. They are not stocked fish so can only assume that someone has 'dumped' them in there from a garden pond not thinking of anything except to get rid. Thankfully there's no sign of any disease and they are thriving but it does make me think that if just one was infected with anything then we could have lost quite a number of fish.
 

DoubleRed

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Natural England have removed the carp from Hatchet Pond in the New Forest citing the fact that they are causing poor water quality. The irony after netting the 1st day they caught 16 fish in 12 acres of water
 

Beadsy

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BAA Retreat Farm pools were recently infested with them and closed for the best part of a year but recently reopened. According to comments on the BAA forums pool 1 is now fishing better than before (carp) but most people can’t buy a bite on pool 2 (tench and crucians). The pools are adjacent to the Severn and the way it floods I wouldn’t be surprised if they turn up in the there at some time.
 

rudd

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Of course you are only talking about the signal crayfish and not our native ones i assume?

Other species they can wipe out are the bitterling, the Wels, the grass carp and all members of the king carp family (mirror, leather, common) , sturgeon and sterlet.

The aquarist shops should also be banned from selling any imported fish that can survive and possibly breed in our climate, i wonder what the count is for the amount of people who have fish then get bored of them or have to get rid of them for some reason and release them into the nearest brook, river, pool or canal without thought?
Yes signals, my local waters have a good few oddities including a few terrapins.
 

Peezartiste

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A few years back I was fishing and my baited hook (Size 18, red maggot) was in the water in front of me while I sorted out the line which had wrapped round the tip. There was a little tug and I lifted the line to see a greeny coloured fish that at first glance appeared to be a small perch. When I examined it, it was like no fish I had caught before. I asked a local in the next peg and he said they caught them occasionally and called them 'Japanese sand bass' which I never heard of. I took photos and investigated and it was in fact a cichlid, which originates in the Rift Valley in Africa/Ethiopia.
 

TrickyD

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A few years back I was fishing and my baited hook (Size 18, red maggot) was in the water in front of me while I sorted out the line which had wrapped round the tip. There was a little tug and I lifted the line to see a greeny coloured fish that at first glance appeared to be a small perch. When I examined it, it was like no fish I had caught before. I asked a local in the next peg and he said they caught them occasionally and called them 'Japanese sand bass' which I never heard of. I took photos and investigated and it was in fact a cichlid, which originates in the Rift Valley in Africa/Ethiopia.
Sure it wasn't a sun bass/pumpkinseed? They look like cichlids.
 

kevin o connor

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Hold on, I thought the politicians all say the Immigrants are positive for Britain !!!
 

Peezartiste

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Sure it wasn't a sun bass/pumpkinseed? They look like cichlids.
Possible I misheard and he said sun not sand. That sounds sensible. But I still don't think it should have been in a lake in Somerset
 

TrickyD

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Possible I misheard and he said sun not sand. That sounds sensible. But I still don't think it should have been in a lake in Somerset
Had them in Tanyards fishery in Sussex years ago, they are a pretty fish. I think Bill Rushmer holds the record.
 

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