Elasticated feeders vs Free running

Maverick

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Getting away from the fact most fisheries don't allow elasticated feeders and a lot of folk think they are wrong what about the resistance factor?

Do you think fish feel the elastic tension and drop the bait and back off, or is it too late for them and they're already hooked? Also do you feel with less resistance you get more takes on a free running feeder than you would on an elasticated one?
 

Dave

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The minute the fish take up the tension in the hooklength they'll feel resistance regardless of which type of feeder.
The difference is with an elasticated feeder once they bolt away they will set the hook against the weight of the feeder, whereas with a free-running feeder they are pulling line and the main source of resistance would be the rod tip.
Saying that, it all depends on the direction the fish bolt and the free-running ability of the feeder - if the fish bolt in the direction of the rod then the line will drag the feeder anyway
 

gingert76

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just wondering why you are asking? never fished a elasticated feeder as they should be banned full stop IMHO and never felt the need to change from a inline running method feeder. if you think about it if the bait is on the feeder or next to it as the fish sucks the bait in the angle of the hook link is the same (elastic or inline) and with either feeder a sharp hook will still prick the fish as it sucks in the bait the same as a non elastic feeder and then it bolts or even better on a slope the feeder then moves and the fished is hooked. only thing i can think of a elastic feeder helping is the playing of fish as i would think its much harder to break a hooklength as you have 4 inches of line then the elastic but never had a hooklength snap on method fishing with inline feeder so just have to play the fish properly
 

gingert76

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only thing i would say dave is the resistance on the tip would depend on distance, i would expect the main resistance to be the line through the water when fishing 50+ yards as it does impart a lot of drag
 

ukzero1

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Resistance would also come into play on the strength of the tip. The fish will feel less resistance on a 1oz tip as to a 3oz one.
 

Paulmlpss

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I find you lose less fish with elasticated feeders. With inline I find the feeder sometimes bounces the hook out when playing them.
 

Dan s

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There’s nothing wrong with the Guru elasticated feeders they wouldn’t be call X-Safe if they wasn’t save to use.
Look at the type of anglers Guru sponsor there all about fish welfare
 

ukzero1

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There’s nothing wrong with the Guru elasticated feeders they wouldn’t be call X-Safe if they wasn’t save to use.
Look at the type of anglers Guru sponsor there all about fish welfare
If there's nothing wrong with them, why are fisheries banning them? They wouldn't do that for no reason. It's inline only round here on all the fisheries.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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In discussing X-Safe feeders recently I was told that some anglers adapt the feeders so that they are no longer "safe". i.e. the elastic will not pull through if the line breaks. I can only assume people may do this if they fear the system failing and the line coming off the feeder by accident thus losing the fish being played.

One reason Wellingborough ban all elasticated feeders including X-Safe on their match style lakes.

As UK says, if you have an outright ban on any elasticated feeder then you should not have any issues. And as someone who has not owned an elasticated feeder for several years I can't see the need for them.

Mind you people struggle to understand that "No Groundbait" means you cannot use groundbait. So whether people similarly don't understand "No Elasticated Feeders" I can't say.
 

Paul22

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I only ever use inline feeders as I do believe it’s safer....... fish feeling the resistance is a funny one because we don’t really know how many time the hook bait has been mouthed before we hook a fish.......we assume that a fish when hooked is the first bite but I’m not so sure.
If you look at underwater footage of feeder fishing it amazing how far the fish swims before a bite is registered although the method feeder is different to feeder fishing I’m sure it still gets mouthed.
Fortunately carp tend to suck a big mouthful of bait in with the hookbait in amongst it and before it realises it’s hooked.
One thing to take note of is the method feeder doesn’t always get to the bottom intact in a nice neat pile like we imagine 🐟
 
D

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I think the rod tip is of less importance than people assume. The line is under tension through the water and a bolting fish will dislodge the feeder causing the hooking.

I don’t feel a need to ever use an elasticated feeder.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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What I find fascinating though is that fish can show a definite hookbait preference on the Method or similar feeder.
 

ukzero1

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I think the rod tip is of less importance than people assume. The line is under tension through the water and a bolting fish will dislodge the feeder causing the hooking.

I don’t feel a need to ever use an elasticated feeder.
I'm not so sure about that. Round here, bolt rigs are also banned and the only way to fish free-running is to put a rubber bead (knot protector) between feeder/bomb and swivel so there is no bolt effect. Yes, the water itself will give some tension, but so will the rod tip depending on the strength. A 1oz tip will give less tension than say a 3oz. The less resistance, the better the indication.
 

ukzero1

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What I find fascinating though is that fish can show a definite hookbait preference on the Method or similar feeder.
I noticed the same thing. Fishing a small boilie (or any bait for that matter) with the bomb, and very few bites, but put the same size boilie on with a method and I get better results including those 'wrap arounds'
 

Paul22

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What I find fascinating though is that fish can show a definite hookbait preference on the Method or similar feeder.
Neil is there any pattern to this or is it random?
What I mean is do you always start with a certain bait and switch to another regular bait or do you just use what takes your fancy that day ?
 
D

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I'm not so sure about that. Round here, bolt rigs are also banned and the only way to fish free-running is to put a rubber bead (knot protector) between feeder/bomb and swivel so there is no bolt effect. Yes, the water itself will give some tension, but so will the rod tip depending on the strength. A 1oz tip will give less tension than say a 3oz. The less resistance, the better the indication.
We’ve previously had this conversation.

My set up for the method is for an entirely free running feeder to a bead which doesn’t connect to the feeder in any way. Not a bolt rig under your definition.

I’m of the view that it is the pressure of the water against the line that creates the tension.
A fish picking up the bait will dislodge the feeder and hook itself. Bites are unmistakable and avoiding your rod being pulled in is more of an issue than tip strength.

That being said I’m looking to use the lightest tip possible for casting purposes and generally use a 1oz tip on an acolyte feeder rod.
 

johng19

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[QUOTE="Neil ofthe nene, post: 2385927, membe people struggle to understand that "No Groundbait" means you cannot use groundbait. So whether people similarly don't understand "No Elasticated Feeders" I can't say.
[/QUOTE]
Your right there, we fish a few places that say no ground bait, but you can use paste. So now you get them with a tub of ground bait, but when questioned they say it's paste, when it is clearly not a paste.
 

rudd

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I find you lose less fish with elasticated feeders. With inline I find the feeder sometimes bounces the hook out when playing them.
You are using to heavy a feeder then.
I have been using 20g methods and hardly !ost a fish compared to 30g and above.
Also find the same when using leads, smaller lead, !ess fish lost.
I feel fish can use the weight in their favour, as they turn the hookhold can loosen and hook (barbless) can turn making the hole its made bigger until hook comes out.
I would say that with approx 60% of all my method/lead caught fish the hook comes out on its own as fish is in !anding net.

When I swapped to lighter feeders I was worried about the self hooking effect - It has not been a problem, so for the OP my answer is No.
 

Neil ofthe nene

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Neil is there any pattern to this or is it random?
What I mean is do you always start with a certain bait and switch to another regular bait or do you just use what takes your fancy that day ?
A lot depends on the fishery and time of year.

In Winter my starting point will be 3 or 4 dead reds switching to corn and then hard pellet. But each fishery can have its own preferences. For example yesterday I used meat exclusively because I know that the fish at that venue react well to that bait. Elsewhere I may start of a different bait depending on what I have learned from previous visits.

If a new venue in Summer or one where I have not sorted it out then I will normally go: corn, hard pellet, meat then one of several flavours of dumbells, maggot may make an appearance if I have remembered to get some from the freezer. Basically I start with what I think will work and I am confident will stay on the hook. For that reason if I intend fishing meat I will have a slice or two of polony with me, though yesterday I forgot it and found luncheon meat worked OK (pellet feeder).

Then of course we have the type of feeder: Method, Hybrid, Banjo, Pellet. I have found the fish can display a preference and will switch type until I find what they want. On one fishery I have only been to twice I have ended up catching using 8mm pellet on a Banjo. So if I go back that would be my starting point.

All of the above is to me a good reason to keep a log of your trips. Memory can play tricks, a written record is much more reliable.
 

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