Clipping up

Markywhizz

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You won’t break off on casting clipped up. You just won’t if you are using 5lb line which is normal for a feeder.
 

Lee Richards

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Not strictly true that Mark if you are constantly casting you should regularly check the line where clipped for wear and tear.(all areas around potential stress/abrasion points really)

Reason for this is the line trapped in the clip will always be the point that sees the most stress.
This will be compounded if rods are left set up for fishing the same venue and the clipped point remains the same.
 
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ukzero1

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Not strictly true that Mark if you are constantly casting you should regularly check the line where clipped for wear and tear.(all areas around potential stress/abrasion points really)

Reason for this is the line trapped in the clip will always be the point that sees the most stress.
This will be compounded if rods are left set up for fishing the same venue and the clipped point remains the same.
There's also the clip itself, there are some that aren't line friendly, as I found out. Some clips fray the line and some clips just snap off from the spool.
 

PJG

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If I put a stop knot on the line to mark the distance I always have trouble removing it when packing up. Is there a special marker line to make this easier? With carp rods because the rings are so much bigger a small piece of electricians tape works fine but this is no good for feeder rods, any ideas would be appreciated, thanks.

Tippex works but always cracks off too easily.
 

alsur

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Nearly always clip up very rarely have any problems and have landed double figures Carp, there is a lot of stretch in mono and as describe you can get a bit of line on spool.
 

rudd

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Tie a slider stop knot on the line and place it behind the clip, if you hook into a big fish un-clip play the fish then just clip back up to the stop knot.
Use yellow marker braid for visability or lower strength pole elastic.
 

rudd

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Clipping up is necessary for me on a lot of the waters I fish matches on. Hitting within a few inches of the island could be the difference between waiting 30 seconds for a bite or waiting 5 minutes for a bite. Obviously In match conditions this time is valuable.

I don’t care how good at casting you are, nobody can hit within a few inches of an island every cast without a clip.
I clipped up a mini spod to get loose pellets dropping over my method feeder up against a snag when after Tench the other week. Bang on each time I feed.
 

Dave

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If you're not comfortable clipping up, cast out to where you want to be then get a small rubber band and put it over your spool so that it's tight and traps your line.
Works the same as a clip as long as the band is tight, double it up if need be.
 

Chervil

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I have huge problems casting to a clip and must have spent hours, looking at videos like these, I think my problem is I over gun it. When this all settles down, I'm thinking of getting some tuition. That and some for fly fishing.
I have one of the MAP reels shown in the second video. The clip seems fine, not sure if it is just my reel, but retrieving, even without a fish on feels like i'm pulling the end tackle through weed. Haven't used it for a few years now.


 

Neil ofthe nene

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You should not fear the line breaking at the clip as long as you are not casting a heavy feeder too hard with light line.

I am currently working on a blog piece about feeder fishing (8 pages so far!). I wrote the following about casting accuracy a couple of days ago.




Distance is probably the easiest to master. With a line clip you can hit the same distance time after time. Though some worry about using a clip with carp as the intended quarry. The most important thing is to cast with confidence and hit the clip firmly with every cast.

If casting to a far bank the clip can be used with confidence. If a fish is hooked it can only swim left or right and side strain with a low rod tip should see it under control. In open water, if you are not confident of using the clip there are a couple of things you can do to maintain accurate distance.

First is to find your desired distance then put a rubber band around the reel spool. This will stop the cast in flight like a line clip but can be pulled off by a big fish if it runs away from you.

Second is to again find your distance and then tie some line onto the main line with a sliding knot just in front of the reel. When casting listen for the sliding knot to rattle through the rod rings, trap the line on the spool and the feeder should land at about the same distance each time. Once tightened up to the feeder the knot should be visible either between the rod rings or just off the tip.

It is a good idea to count how many turns of the reel handle it takes to retrieve the feeder. If you have to take the line off the clip, or the rubber band gets pulled off you can, within a few casts, get the distance perfect again.

One thing to teach yourself is to have the rod in the same position as the feeder hits the line clip. I prefer to drop the rod to the side. Others hold the rod above their head.

Perfection is stopping the feeder in flight a foot or two above the water so that it falls just that distance before hitting the surface. Whether you then keep a tight or slack line to the feeder as it sinks is personal choice. Sometimes dictated by the depth of water.
 

robert d

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You should not fear the line breaking at the clip as long as you are not casting a heavy feeder too hard with light line.

I am currently working on a blog piece about feeder fishing (8 pages so far!). I wrote the following about casting accuracy a couple of days ago.




Distance is probably the easiest to master. With a line clip you can hit the same distance time after time. Though some worry about using a clip with carp as the intended quarry. The most important thing is to cast with confidence and hit the clip firmly with every cast.

If casting to a far bank the clip can be used with confidence. If a fish is hooked it can only swim left or right and side strain with a low rod tip should see it under control. In open water, if you are not confident of using the clip there are a couple of things you can do to maintain accurate distance.

First is to find your desired distance then put a rubber band around the reel spool. This will stop the cast in flight like a line clip but can be pulled off by a big fish if it runs away from you.

Second is to again find your distance and then tie some line onto the main line with a sliding knot just in front of the reel. When casting listen for the sliding knot to rattle through the rod rings, trap the line on the spool and the feeder should land at about the same distance each time. Once tightened up to the feeder the knot should be visible either between the rod rings or just off the tip.

It is a good idea to count how many turns of the reel handle it takes to retrieve the feeder. If you have to take the line off the clip, or the rubber band gets pulled off you can, within a few casts, get the distance perfect again.

One thing to teach yourself is to have the rod in the same position as the feeder hits the line clip. I prefer to drop the rod to the side. Others hold the rod above their head.

Perfection is stopping the feeder in flight a foot or two above the water so that it falls just that distance before hitting the surface. Whether you then keep a tight or slack line to the feeder as it sinks is personal choice. Sometimes dictated by the depth of water.
All the ideas will work , I read on other posts that a bicycle iner tube cut down works well to. Nice post Neil
 

crackatoa

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I always clip up, unless I'm casting a bomb around in Winter. On waters where distance isn't a problem, such as a Commercial. When you are likely to encounter larger, hard fighting Carp, especially when using a method feeder. It pays to use a thicker line. My choice is 8lb Daiwa Tournament. It never lets me down
 

sampower

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I’ve never ever snapped off and I fish method a lot. Even if there’s unit.. Mark the line and keep it clipped - unless fishing at very close range with 1000mph bites, once they reach the clip taking line you can just whiz it off then find your marker. As long as you’ve got robust line you won’t snap off
 

rd115

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I have huge problems casting to a clip and must have spent hours, looking at videos like these, I think my problem is I over gun it. When this all settles down, I'm thinking of getting some tuition. That and some for fly fishing.
I have one of the MAP reels shown in the second video. The clip seems fine, not sure if it is just my reel, but retrieving, even without a fish on feels like i'm pulling the end tackle through weed. Haven't used it for a few years now.


It's all muscle memory, do it enough times and you instinctively know how much power to put in the cast.
 
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